Had the Ottoman Empire survived, would a lot of its Arab and Kurdish population have gradually moved to Anatolia and Constantinople?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,746
SoCal
#1
Had the Ottoman Empire survived, would a lot of its Arab and Kurdish population have gradually moved to Anatolia and Constantinople in search of a better life and more opportunities?
 
#3
Had the Ottoman Empire survived, would a lot of its Arab and Kurdish population have gradually moved to Anatolia and Constantinople in search of a better life and more opportunities?
Nope.

Did the Germans move to Rome when they were occupied? Dacians?

I sort of get what your trying to say but especially in terms of Arabs I'd definitely say no.

The Arabs have their own culture which they're very protective of and see their hierachy as a cornerstone of their culture, Tribal loyalty, alliances between sheiks and royal families ........ if they go to Turkey they'd be just another citizen so to speak.

The Arabs didn't like the Turks which was reflected in the ferocity in them shaking off Ottoman rule as soon as a bit of unity gave them the numbers to do so.

Different cultures have different levels of subservience or a relaxation on how and where you live, Arabs are very family orientated in their make up, you wouldn't get hordes of Arabs as ex-pats to Turkey imo.

Not as it is now anyway, if Turkey became some shining jewel of opportunity and technology then maybe some would ......... as it is now? Dubai is better than anything Turkey has.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jun 2012
7,359
Malaysia
#4
Ottoman had already survived for, what, a good part of seven centuries or thereabouts. Or maybe just slightly less. The demographic proportion of Arabs & Kurds, relative to the total overall population of both Constantinople in particular & Anatolia in general, would have already more or less stabilised over that kind of time.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,746
SoCal
#5
Ottoman had already survived for, what, a good part of seven centuries or thereabouts. Or maybe just slightly less. The demographic proportion of Arabs & Kurds, relative to the total overall population of both Constantinople in particular & Anatolia in general, would have already more or less stabilised over that kind of time.
Economic mobility was more limited before the modern era, though.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,746
SoCal
#6
Was Anatolia offering better life and more opportunities?
Well, Turkey is in better shape today than various Arab countries (with the oil-rich Gulf states being an exception to this rule). I don't know if this would have still been the case had the Ottoman Empire survived, though.
 
Oct 2013
14,420
Europix
#8
Well, Turkey is in better shape today than various Arab countries (with the oil-rich Gulf states being an exception to this rule). I don't know if this would have still been the case had the Ottoman Empire survived, though.
The reasons it's in a better shape is because Atatürk made maybe the most radical transformation of a country in the 20th, bolshevism excepted.

I'm not that sure that a surviving OE would have seen such a transformation, and I'm even less sure that it would have succeeded if the attempt would have been made.

The cause of that change and the explanation of it's success is based exactly on the OE's unsurvival. The terms imposed on OE triggered the armed resistance, the military success of the war (which is "the Turkish independence war" for Turks, and that's saying a lot) is what gave Ataturk the status that permitted to implement (enforce would be appropriate in some cases) that reformation.

The current discrepancies aren't so much related to OE but to the post Ottoman period (I would call it "Western mismanagement", thinking mainly to BE and France). Before WWI, the differences weren't so flagrant between Tunisia, Algeria and Anatolia, for example.
 
Likes: Futurist
Jun 2012
7,359
Malaysia
#9
Not as it is now anyway, if Turkey became some shining jewel of opportunity and technology then maybe some would ......... as it is now? Dubai is better than anything Turkey has.
How easy or how difficult is it for an Arab, from say somewhere like Syria, Morocco or Tunisia, to obtain citizenship or permanent residence in Turkey, compared to somewhere like Dubai, Abu Dhabi or Oman? Just as a matter of curiosity.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,746
SoCal
#10
Arab community (pre-Syrian War) in Turkey formed only 2.5% of the overall population, compared to 10% for France.
Turkey doesn't have open borders with Arab countries, though. In contrast, this actually would have been the case to a large extent had the Ottoman Empire survived since the Ottoman Empire contained a lot of Arab-majority territories.