Harappa civilisation

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,052
India
#11

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,052
India
#12
OK I'm not as knowlegable as you good people, but when I read something that implied it may have been destroyed by unnatural means, my thought was This could be the original source of the Sodom Gommorah legend. A fire from the sky destroyed the city. I always see things naturally so to me it was an asteroid strike or several smaller ones. But when big powerful cities disappear, I can not believe they would be forgotten....like I really do believe the Hittite capital's destruction was the original Troy. I mean these stories are universal among the IE religions.
There is no fire angle to this.
 
Sep 2014
694
Texas
#13
Climate change and rivers changing their courses have doomed a lot of once fertile regions and cities. There is an ancient horse raising region in ancient Media that is now very arid that only the hardiest animals can live on. Climate shift linked to rise of Himalayas, Tibetan Plateau
I remember seeing a National Geographic program on this. So Harappa falling to this event the same as some other now desert bound cities makes sense.
 
Sep 2014
694
Texas
#14
I went to read up on Harappa and found that 15% of the skeletal remains show evidence of violent demise, along with TB and leprosy. That is lasted 3000 plus years is remarkable...also that any ruins survived the building of a railway...(we won't name who). I wonder if Mohenjo Daro had the same problems?
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,052
India
#15
I went to read up on Harappa and found that 15% of the skeletal remains show evidence of violent demise, along with TB and leprosy. That is lasted 3000 plus years is remarkable...also that any ruins survived the building of a railway...(we won't name who). I wonder if Mohenjo Daro had the same problems?
The skeleton found by Mortimer Wheeler belongs to different period of the history buried at the same place.
 
Likes: bedb

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,525
Australia
#17
Climate change and rivers changing their courses have doomed a lot of once fertile regions and cities. There is an ancient horse raising region in ancient Media that is now very arid that only the hardiest animals can live on. Climate shift linked to rise of Himalayas, Tibetan Plateau
I remember seeing a National Geographic program on this. So Harappa falling to this event the same as some other now desert bound cities makes sense.
Check out the shifting monsoon patterns that effected IVC ... there used to be one north and one south with an overlap giving 2 in the region enabling 2 crop rotations each year , and specific crops too . This broke down and climate changed and crops changed too ... mainly being replaced by rice which came in from the east .

In my experience, every place, city civilisation that suddenly ended (if not due to earthquake or invasion and war ) usually was climate change, especially when it effects water. When the water fails , it can effect VERY quickly ... you gotta get outa there . We cant survive long without water at all .
 
Likes: bedb
May 2013
1,600
The abode of the lord of the north
#18
I went to read up on Harappa and found that 15% of the skeletal remains show evidence of violent demise, along with TB and leprosy. That is lasted 3000 plus years is remarkable...also that any ruins survived the building of a railway...(we won't name who). I wonder if Mohenjo Daro had the same problems?
You should also consider other sites such as Rakhigarhi, Lothal, Kalibangan etc. to be in the context. While any change in the social order, even if it is due to natural reasons, is sure to bring violence with it, collapse of the civilization had more to do with natural causes such as climatic changes than sheer violence. Remember, only those regions in the arid regions to the northwest of India were perpetually abandoned. Other regions retained the many features of the culture, such as Cemetry - H to the east of the gangetic plains and late harappan settlements in gujarat (Bet Dwaraka etc.), that survived till 15th century BC.
 
Likes: specul8
Oct 2015
778
India
#19
I went to read up on Harappa and found that 15% of the skeletal remains show evidence of violent demise, along with TB and leprosy. That is lasted 3000 plus years is remarkable...also that any ruins survived the building of a railway...(we won't name who). I wonder if Mohenjo Daro had the same problems?
@bedb

This 15.5% stat applies to 115 skeletons found in excavations of Harappa city. The full paper is hidden behind a paymentwall so I am unable to access it. But 115 skeletons include an exceptional community/practice/event which is: "Men, women and children from the pit of skulls, located near the sewer drain outside the city wall, demonstrate the highest rate of injury." Another point worth noting is that Harappa city lies in a conflict zone. It is on an ancient route from Iran/Afghanistan into Indian subcontinent. This Harappa area has been a conflict zone during historical times and may have been the same in prehistoric times as well.

The authors (Schug & others) have provided hard-data after much effort. It is valuable because such insightful info scarce. All the same, we must note that Harappa city was only one city in civilization named after it (Harappan Civilization). Scores of Harappan cities / towns have been excavated but hundreds yet to be. We need more data-points to conclude about the civilization as a whole.

Schug & others have written another paper which is also insightful. [2] It shows that several people in Harappa city suffered from Leprosy and TB.


[1] A peaceful realm? Trauma and social differentiation at Harappa
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1879981712000599?via=ihub

[2] Infection, Disease, and Biosocial Processes at the End of the Indus Civilization
 

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