Has anyone here read Ambedkar's book "Pakistan, or, The Partition of India"?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,936
SoCal
#12
Yes but Mujahirs were educated elites, not entrepreneurs like Sindhi Hindus, their forced displacement had a huge impact on the economy of the newly independent Pakistan.
Educated elites are less capable of contributing to economic growth?

Also, Pakistan's loss was India's gain here. :)
 
Likes: prashanth
Apr 2019
406
India
#14
Yes but their hate for Hindus surpasses every loss.
Ufortunately 'hate' is only glue that keep them together. Dumbos don't know that their hate doesn't exactly 'terrify' us but deeply pains considering they were part of our collective civilization.
I remember one Pakistani commentator on a news channel hit the ceiling because UAE allowed Indians to build a temple in their Islamic country. I was like "Stupid that's not your country to interfere with."
And the more dumbness is not coming from an illiterate commoner:
20190806_182037.png
Like they are part of Arabic civilization and they didn't have a civilization of their own. For an average Arab they will always remain 'Al-Hindi'. Lols

Or hate by spreading falsehood:
20190806_182639.png
20190806_182609.png Spreading hate is the solution for keeping their citizen's 'patriortism' intact.
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,595
India
#15
@Kamayani you are right. The kind of hate they have for minorities like Hindu, Christian and Jews is akin to Nazi or Ku Klux Klan ideology and such type of hate is mainstream in government, army, media and education. I was quite shocked Neo-Nazi kind of hatred for Hindus in mainstream Pakistani movies like Hindu baniya or Hindu dog. Can we even imagine such thing in any liberal democratic country.
 

rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
9,091
India
#16
Oct 2015
1,106
India
#17
Also, if so, what were your thoughts on it?

For the record, this book is available for free online here:

Pakistan, or, The Partition of India, by Dr. B. R. Ambedkar
With the link you have given, I have read in parts. Ambedkar's written communication has a clarify which no political leader possesed among his contemporaries.

Unity to Disunity:

It give an interpretation of Indian social & political history from 1920-1945. During this period a marked change occurred in the attitude of Jinnah / Muslim League / Muslims towards Congress. The two parties which at beginning stood together demanding 'Swarajya' (Self-rule), however, by the end had parted ways and demand for a separate nation by Muslim League arose.

"The victory of the Congress at the polls in the provinces, where the Hindus are in a majority, did not disturb the tranquillity of the Musalmans. .. The Musalmans, who at the Round Table Conference joined in the demand for Swaraj, are today the most ruthless opponents of Swaraj." [1]

Reasons for Disunity:

According to Ambedkar, this break happened due to acts of commissions and omissions of Congress Party once ministries were formed in 1937 consequent to provincial elections.

"What has the Congress done to annoy the Muslims so much? .. Two committees appointed by the League are said to have investigated and reported on the matter [oppression of Muslims]. But apart from these matters .. there are undoubtedly two things which have produced the clash: (1) the refusal by the Congress to recognize the Muslim League as the only representative body of the Muslims, (2) the refusal by the Congress to form Coalition Ministries in the Congress Provinces." [1]

Gandhi's errors & Quit India Movement:

Later, the author criticizes Gandhi for for not tackling this Hindu-Muslim issue head-on but dilly-dallying. He says that instead of handling the divide, Gandhi launched Quit India Movement which was dilatory. It was an attempt to win independence bypassing the minority issue, and saying that Congress will handle the matter, British need not. He also says Quit India Movement was a "complete failure" and "diabolical" [2]

"It was a mad venture and took the most diabolical form. It was a scorch[ed]-earth campaign in which the victims of looting, arson and murder were Indians, and the perpetrators were Congressmen." [2]

Gandhi attempts to come to grip of the issue:

Finally Gandhi acted on tackling Hindu-Muslim issue by writing to Jinnah seeking a meeting which happened in Sep 1944. The meeting / talks went on for 18 days:

"They met on the 9th September 1944. It was good that at long last wisdom dawned on Mr. Gandhi, and he agreed to see the light which was staring him in the face and which he had so far refused to see." [2]

Way Ahead:

Ambedkar then moves to options available to British, Congress & ML for going ahead.

Regards

Rajeev
....

[1] 103
[2] 600epilog
 
Oct 2015
1,106
India
#18
The wisest advice Ambedkar gives in the book are in following two chapters:

14.6 The problems of population transfer are solvable and need not detain us​
15.1 Partition is a very possible contingency for which it's best to be prepared​

Ambedkar asked us to prepare for Partition. Instead of preparing, Mountbatten preponed the independence by 10 months, from Jun 1948 to Aug 1947. Independence days were celebrated before the Radcliffe Commission gave its report on boundary - so some people did not know whether they were in India or Pakistan.

Gandhi went to Noakhali (Bangladesh) to restore peace and then to Kolkata to stop the riots thru his fast-unto-death. Nehru was out of his depth, which probably is the reason he asked Mountbatten to continue as Governor General of India.

Jinnah, enjoying the glory of creating a nation, was unconcerned, and anyway a very sick man. His ambulance was struck in a traffic jam in Karachi when he was being moved to a hospital. He died in the ambulance - unable to breathe.

Ignoring Ambedkar's advice cost us about a million lives!
 
Apr 2019
406
India
#19
The wisest advice Ambedkar gives in the book are in following two chapters:

14.6 The problems of population transfer are solvable and need not detain us​
15.1 Partition is a very possible contingency for which it's best to be prepared​

Ambedkar asked us to prepare for Partition. Instead of preparing, Mountbatten preponed the independence by 10 months, from Jun 1948 to Aug 1947. Independence days were celebrated before the Radcliffe Commission gave its report on boundary - so some people did not know whether they were in India or Pakistan.

Gandhi went to Noakhali (Bangladesh) to restore peace and then to Kolkata to stop the riots thru his fast-unto-death. Nehru was out of his depth, which probably is the reason he asked Mountbatten to continue as Governor General of India.

Jinnah, enjoying the glory of creating a nation, was unconcerned, and anyway a very sick man. His ambulance was struck in a traffic jam in Karachi when he was being moved to a hospital. He died in the ambulance - unable to breathe.

Ignoring Ambedkar's advice cost us about a million lives!
A few week ago I had posted a comment having similiar views but offcource with little articulation and no credible source.
It seemed like partition was inevitable and we should've prepared for it in advance instead of loosing other million of our numbers. How insightless our leaders had been throughout this process!
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,936
SoCal
#20
The wisest advice Ambedkar gives in the book are in following two chapters:

14.6 The problems of population transfer are solvable and need not detain us​
15.1 Partition is a very possible contingency for which it's best to be prepared​

Ambedkar asked us to prepare for Partition. Instead of preparing, Mountbatten preponed the independence by 10 months, from Jun 1948 to Aug 1947. Independence days were celebrated before the Radcliffe Commission gave its report on boundary - so some people did not know whether they were in India or Pakistan.

Gandhi went to Noakhali (Bangladesh) to restore peace and then to Kolkata to stop the riots thru his fast-unto-death. Nehru was out of his depth, which probably is the reason he asked Mountbatten to continue as Governor General of India.

Jinnah, enjoying the glory of creating a nation, was unconcerned, and anyway a very sick man. His ambulance was struck in a traffic jam in Karachi when he was being moved to a hospital. He died in the ambulance - unable to breathe.

Ignoring Ambedkar's advice cost us about a million lives!
Excellent points, Rajeev! BTW, I wonder if partition might have ultimately been cancelled had Mountbatten stuck to the original date of June 1948. I mean, by that time, Jinnah was even more ill and I'm not sure that he would have been able to continue hiding his symptoms at that point in time. If it becomes clear that Jinnah is dying, is Mountbatten going to try stalling partition even further, and, if so, is there ultimately going to be a deal between the INC and the ML after Jinnah's death to cancel partition?
 

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