Has the Sagara of Al-Beruni Been Identified?

Apr 2018
77
Ayodhya
So reading across the first volume of Al-Beruni's Kitab-al-Hind (in translation), I cam across him recounting the story of some Rajput king named Sagara. This king's father was killed by a Muslim army from Al Beruni's homeland, in the West. So when the child grew up and learned the story of how his father died, from his mother, he became enraged and invaded the Western lands, ruled by the Muslims. He destroyed the army and slaughtered them all. Then, in order to humiliate the native Hindus in that area, King Sagara forced them to adopt the dress, custom, manners, etc of the Muslims (who in those days were considered Rakshasas and Mlecchas). Here is the passage:

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So can anyone identify this historical king, Sagara?
 
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Mar 2019
1,809
KL
this may just be a myth or story of a hero created by the local peopl to counter the invasion they were facing, if al beruni himself cannot identify the person most probably means that its just a myth.

regards
 
Mar 2019
1,809
KL
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well, this is interesting what the buddhists believed, i-e buddhism spread to persia, iraq, afghanistan, mosul upto the frontiers of syria up until zoroasterianism came, is it based on any evidence or completey cooked up BS? interestingly they dont believe that aryans/hindus eliminated buddhism from india as well.

regards
 
Apr 2018
77
Ayodhya
Well, Al Beruni did identify the king as Sagara, and I would trust his words over any of our modern historians, since he likely had access to sources that perhaps no longer exist. Al Beruni had a critical eye to distinguish fact from fiction, and we can see that through his strain of thinking depicted in the Kitab al Hind.

As far as Buddhism is concerned, there is no solid evidence that Hinduism eliminated it. Even in the passage above, it says that the Buddhists are closer to the Brahmins than any other community. That eliminates any possibility of Brahmins oppressing the Buddhists in Al Beruni's age. It was likely Islamic invasions that destroyed Buddhist centers and eliminated the religion. The predatory raids of the Muslims on Nalanda, as reported by Dharmasvamin in 1234-36 is well known...

It may be possible that Buddhism spread that far. If I can recall correctly, Ashoka's inscriptions also suggest that Buddhism had spread far and wide.
 
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