Has Western capitalism become too efficient and ruthless?

Oct 2010
5,195
DC
Could be a clue. If I'm not mistaking, his administration was about deregulation too.
It would be a good thing to look at.

Although, I think the tuition explosion over the last 20 years is something that I can not comprehend yet.

I went into a state-school (as an out of state payer) 20 years ago, my tuition then is about 30% of what in-state student pays now and about 15% of what an out of state student pays, and that is in CALIFORNIA.

I've looked a bit into the 20 mil and 40 mil European countries for comparisons. I admit it's becoming a bit fastidious ...

Poland and Romania are a bit difficult to take into account: they're still in a reforming proces (they inherited a communist system), they still have economical difficulties, and they have a lack of personnel that it's even bigger than in other countries (the emigration rate of qualified personnel is awful), lack of financement/investissement, aso. For the moment, I would rather dismiss them as examples, or take them as of examples on how things aren't working out.

I'll (maybe) go further with Spain and Netherlands ... later ....
It was more of a point-making tool than anything else, the economic situation/structure , the demographics (including immigration) , ..etc for each state might dictate what kind of a system it chooses.

California for example has chosen now to subsidize illegal immigrants. I could attribute many motives to that but this thread is not the place for it.
 
Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
It is not about insulation from comparison, it is about considering local needs and expenses thereof.
Ok, total health expenses per capita, ordered by population size.

Germany (82m) - 5,500 $
France (65m) - 4,600 $
Spain (46m) - 3,209 $
California (39m) - 7,500 $
Texas (25m) - 7,000 $
N.Y. (19m) - 9,800 $
Netherlands (17m) - 5,300 $
Illinois (13 m) - 8,200 $
Belgium (11m) - 4,900 $
Switzerland (8m) - 7,900 $
Colorado (5m) - 6,800 $
Norway (5m) - 6,600 $
Iowa (3m) - 8,200 $
Luxembourg (0,5m) - 7,400 $

(Hope it's of use, cause You ow me not one, but two beers it!)

As for local needs and comparisons, I can't but copy Nao, as he's right:

The EU has 28 (soon to be 27) different national health systems that coexist and interact without a problem, not to mention the private options available in each country.

It has a population of 508 million.

I don't think the US can argue exceptionalism on these grounds.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
That's rather an absurd argument, with all do respect.
No, it isn't. Of course there are some exceptions, like the Saami, but when you look at the genetic variation in combination with sheer numbers the genetic constitution of Europeans is more similar than that of nations like the U.S. and Brazil. which make for a much more complicated set of health factors. In the U.S., for example, people have come from Africa, the Americas, itself in the from of the indigenous natives, Asia - especially the Indian subcontinent, and Europe, all in rather large numbers.
Europeans All Closely Related, Gene Study Shows
Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'
Larger Genetic Differences Within Africans Than Between Africans and Eurasians
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/g...-vary-as-a-function-of-distance/#.XSj44ehKjIU
Of course we cannot discuss things here, but I encourage you to Google the subject and read outside of this forum.
 
Oct 2010
5,195
DC
DF, You can have as many beers as you can handle if you are not driving afterwards.:)

As for what Nao said, the for and against any system is a choice for the state (or states if they choose to).
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,070
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Europeans are rather homogenous, from a genetic perspective, ethnicity aside.
Even if that were true, it's irrelevant.

Each European country, and even regions within those countries, provides the services that meet their particular needs. If the needs are different due to more prevalent ailments amongst their population, they will provide the services necessary to meet those ailments.

Britain has a national health service, but it does not mean that the services are identical everywhere. Birmingham has a high Asian/sub-continental population, so the local NHS units provide whatever that particular population needs.
 
Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
No, it isn't. Of course there are some exceptions, like the Saami, but when you look at the genetic variation in combination with sheer numbers the genetic constitution of Europeans is more similar than that of nations like the U.S. and Brazil. which make for a much more complicated set of health factors. In the U.S., for example, people have come from Africa, the Americas, itself in the from of the indigenous natives, Asia - especially the Indian subcontinent, and Europe, all in rather large numbers.
Europeans All Closely Related, Gene Study Shows
Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'
Larger Genetic Differences Within Africans Than Between Africans and Eurasians
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/g...-vary-as-a-function-of-distance/#.XSj44ehKjIU
Of course we cannot discuss things here, but I encourage you to Google the subject and read outside of this forum.
I really don't need to hooglit, my friend: You don't need to make different aspirins for different people. The aspirin works for black and yellow people even if it's white.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
Even if that were true, it's irrelevant.

Each European country, and even regions within those countries, provides the services that meet their particular needs. If the needs are different due to more prevalent ailments amongst their population, they will provide the services necessary to meet those ailments.

Britain has a national health service, but it does not mean that the services are identical everywhere. Birmingham has a high Asian/sub-continental population, so the local NHS units provide whatever that particular population needs.
I am simply considering why the health outcomes are worse in the U.S. One's heredity contributes a great deal to one's health constitution. This is why those who are adopted are often at a disadvantage and why every healthcare professional has you fill out a survey which includes your family history. It does matter. I am not saying other nations don't address the health needs of their diverse population. What I am saying is I wonder how much a vastly diverse population in such sheer numbers (some groups number in the 10s of millions, often more than the entire population of some European nations) impact health outcomes. .
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
I really don't need to hooglit, my friend: You don't need to make different aspirins for different people. The aspirin works for black and yellow people even if it's white.
I am afraid you are minimizing how complicated medical care and treatment is my friend beyond the proverbial aspirin.