Has Western capitalism become too efficient and ruthless?

Jun 2014
5,992
US
I really don't need to hooglit, my friend: You don't need to make different aspirins for different people. The aspirin works for black and yellow people even if it's white.
Apparently aspirin affects genders differently my friend. :)
Aspirin study refocuses prevention message for women - Harvard Health
And... African American women are affected differently than white women according to this study.
African American women more resistant to anti-inflammatory effect of aspirin than white women
The human body is indeed unique and biological factors do matter apparently.
 
Apr 2010
33,641
T'Republic of Yorkshire
I am simply considering why the health outcomes are worse in the U.S. One's heredity contributes a great deal to one's health constitution. This is why those who are adopted are often at a disadvantage and why every healthcare professional has you fill out a survey which includes your family history. It does matter. I am not saying other nations don't address the health needs of their diverse population. What I am saying is I wonder how much a vastly diverse population in such sheer numbers (some groups number in the 10s of millions, often more than the entire population of some European nations) impact health outcomes. .
There are other factors, like diet and healthy lifestyles.

Scandinavians are much more health conscious than people in the UK and visit the doctor for mild ailments, allowing them to catch more serious illnesses early.

Perhaps the high cost of deductibles in the US puts people off visiting their doctor when they should.
 
Jun 2014
5,992
US
There are other factors, like diet and healthy lifestyles.

Scandinavians are much more health conscious than people in the UK and visit the doctor for mild ailments, allowing them to catch more serious illnesses early.

Perhaps the high cost of deductibles in the US puts people off visiting their doctor when they should.
I don't disagree with these factors. I am simply trying to consider all factors. I have mentioned in previous posts that Americans are more obese than many others. Processed foods and lack of exercise don't help one's health. Deductibles may be a reason why more Americans don't visit the doctor, but I can say, anecdotally, I have several relatives and friends with good health care and minimal co-pays for a doctor's visit (maybe $20) who won't go to the doctor because they say "I don't like going to the doctor's." I believe they are afraid of what the doctor is going to tell them or what steps they may need to take to remedy their ailments.
 
Apr 2010
33,641
T'Republic of Yorkshire
It depends, my plan has no deductible as I specifically picked it up to cover any hospital visits with minimal copay.

I used to visit my doctor regularly even when I had no insurance.
i don't know the reason, I'm just speculating. There are probably many reasons, but I don't think there is any exceptionalism behind it.
 
Jun 2014
5,992
US
It depends, my plan has no deductible as I specifically picked it up to cover any hospital visits with minimal copay.

I used to visit my doctor regularly even when I had no insurance.
I have no deductible either and a minimal co-pay. Colonoscopies are covered at 100%. I can't tell you how many men I work with who are over 50 and simply won't get it done. There is no charge for them either. Maybe Americans are more fatalistic or risky than some others?
 
Oct 2010
5,075
DC
i don't know the reason, I'm just speculating. There are probably many reasons, but I don't think there is any exceptionalism behind it.
I don’t know the reason either, I have many insured relatives who don’t go to a GP regularly.
We are from a similar cultural background and I think the idea of visiting without being sick is strange to them. Yet they are not a representative sample.
I have no deductible either and a minimal co-pay. Colonoscopies are covered at 100%. I can't tell you how many men I work with who are over 50 and simply won't get it done. There is no charge for them either. Maybe Americans are more fatalistic or risky than some others?
Macho culture, maybe?
 
Sep 2011
5,387
Europeans are rather homogenous, from a genetic perspective, ethnicity aside.
Well, humanity itself is pretty darn homogenous from a genetic perspective.

The US isn't fx trying to weld together with a part of its continent that was run according to Soviet Planned Economy lines for half a century. Or had traditionalist paternalistic autocratic or military dictatures (Spain, Portugal, Greece) in living memory. Or for that matter a little longer ways back outright right-wing totalitarian states, Fascism and Nazism. Which at other times can and has been used as indictments against the EU/Europe compared to the US. But here the EU is somehow supposedly super-homogenous? We were all Soviets and Nazis and everything in between at the same time or what?

The US has no semi-recent history of wildly differing political systems and societal models. You have literally spent a century and a half, since the slave society thing got the boot, on the same program. Considerable US homogenity is the outcome. Sure, it's highly pluralistic, more so than a lot of smaller EU nations (big nations tend be to an extent unavoidably pluralistic), but with that US society itself is strikingly consistent.
 
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Jan 2010
4,417
Atlanta, Georgia USA
I see this point in the article as an important reason, but that's just my read of it: "Eckel pointed to Food & Water Watch research finding that private water utilities tend to charge almost 60 percent more than public counterparts."
My point is that there is no need to make it illegal; the City already owns the water service, so why does it need to pass a law stating that it won’t privatize it? Did some business make a takeover bid? Or is this just political posturing?
 

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