Have the sahel heavy cavalry ever used iron horse armour

Feb 2018
92
ohio
They started wearing local armour after their own stuff wore out and couldn't be replaced.
Actually no thats not true they found that their armor greatly inhibited their mobility

Combat and Capture in the Aztec Empire | Hassig | British Journal for Military History

And although Spanish armour was iron or steel, it was hotter, heavier, and offered little more protection against native arms than the lighter, cooler native cotton armour which many Spaniards adopted. Although their solid plate could not be penetrated by arrows, their stone points shattered on them frequently throwing fragments into their wearer's faces. Those who wore mail discovered that while they could stop arrow points, their reed shafts could nevertheless continue their momentum, splinter, and send slivers on through the links. Moreover, the Spaniards found that the stones thrown by slings affected them the most, as rigid armour did not absorb their impact as did cotton armour. As for its disadvantage, during the attack along the causeways, the Aztecs quickly discovered that in simply grabbing a Spaniard and pulling him into the lake, the armour would assist in drowning them. Whatever the pros and cons of the Spanish armour (and few of them had full body armour), it did not provide the apparent advantage. The Aztecs were already accustomed to fighting armoured opponents, albeit with a different type, and although a very few Spaniards may have worn greaves or other leg armour, the basic Aztec strategy of attacking the legs to bring down their opponents, rendered the vast number of Spaniards just as vulnerable as their indigenous allies.
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,749
Australia
Actually no thats not true they found that their armor greatly inhibited their mobility

Combat and Capture in the Aztec Empire | Hassig | British Journal for Military History
A lot of people think they know a bit about metal armour but don't have a clue about historical textile or leather armour.

1. Aztec cloth armour was 2-3 fingers thick so did not allow for any kind of ventilation. It was even more stifling than metal armour. Try wearing 3 or 4 hoodies in the jungle and tell me how cool you feel.

2. Aztec cloth armour weighed more than European metal armour so it hindered movement more, not less. When soaked in rain or sweat the weight difference was even worse.

The whole point of using metal to make armour is that it was lighter than any of the alternatives. It wasn't until the invention of aramid (kevlar) that metal stopped being the optimal material for body armour.
 
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Aug 2016
977
US&A
A lot of people think they know a bit about metal armour but don't have a clue about historical textile or leather armour.

1. Aztec cloth armour was 2-3 fingers thick so did not allow for any kind of ventilation. It was even more stifling than metal armour. Try wearing 3 or 4 hoodies in the jungle and tell me how cool you feel.

2. Aztec cloth armour weighed more than European metal armour so it hindered movement more, not less. When soaked in rain or sweat the weight difference was even worse.

The whole point of using metal to make armour is that it was lighter than any of the alternatives. It wasn't until the invention of aramid (kevlar) that metal stopped being the optimal material for body armour.
Could I see your sources for Aztec armor?
 

Dan Howard

Ad Honorem
Aug 2014
4,749
Australia
We've already covered this many times before. It gets tiring repeating the same things over and over. Use the search engine and if you can't my previous posts come back and ask again.