Help in translating a text

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,816
Western Eurasia
#22
on which branch are you more interested? here is an article in Hungarian from a medical history schoolbook:

http://orvostortenet.hu/tankonyvek/tk-05/pdf/5.1.4/1984_107_108_binder_pal_mauksch_csalad.pdf

A Mauksch család erdélyi gyógyszerész tagjai (The Transylvanian pharmacist members of the Mauksch family)


based on the article the The Transylvanian branch of the Mauksch family migrated to Kolozsvár/Cluj in the 18th century from Upper Hungary, from the town of Késmárk (now Kezmarok, Slovakia). they were Zipser Germans. According to family tradition they migrated to the Upper Hungarian Szepesség/Spis/Zips region in the late 16th century from Saxony. They split to two branches ( a noble and a burgher one) in the 17th century after one branch was elevated to nobility. The Transylvanian branch is coming from the burgher branch from Késmárk, when one member, Tobias Mauksch the elder (1727-1805) moved to Kolozsvár. He married two times and had several children and they opened other chapters too in diff Transylvanian towns. One of his sons was János Márton (Johann Martin) Mauksch. The latters daughter, Matilde Mauksch (around 1810-1863) married to another pharmacist and Lutheran minister from Segesvár/Sighisoara, Georg Gottlieb Hintz (1808-1876). This way the shop in Kolozsvár/Cluj ended up to the Hintz family. Their son György Hintz jr. (1840-1890) continued the family business in the city. The article mentions some other Mauksch members and goes in more biographical details but it concentrates more on those who were engaged in the medical profession.

The article is footnoted and in those mostly German references there must be a lot of more detailed genealogical info. i'm sure the Hintz family's previous history is also well documented since they came from an educated upper class, primer sources must be in German, Hungarian and Latin.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2013
14,443
Europix
#23
on which branch are you more interested? here is an article in Hungarian from a medical history schoolbook:

http://orvostortenet.hu/tankonyvek/tk-05/pdf/5.1.4/1984_107_108_binder_pal_mauksch_csalad.pdf

A Mauksch család erdélyi gyógyszerész tagjai (The Transylvanian pharmacist members of the Mauksch family)


based on the article the The Transylvanian branch of the Mauksch family migrated to Kolozsvár/Cluj in the 18th century from Upper Hungary, from the town of Késmárk (now Kezmarok, Slovakia). they were Zipser Germans. According to family tradition they migrated to the Upper Hungarian Szepesség/Spis/Zips region in the late 16th century from Saxony. They split to two branches ( a noble and a burgher one) in the 17th century after one branch was elevated to nobility. The Transylvanian branch is coming from the burgher branch from Késmárk, when one member, Tobias Mauksch the elder (1727-1805) moved to Kolozsvár. He married two times and had several children and they opened other chapters too in diff Transylvanian towns. One of his sons was János Márton (Johann Martin) Mauksch. The latters daughter, Matilde Mauksch (around 1810-1863) married to another pharmacist and Lutheran minister from Segesvár/Sighisoara, Georg Gottlieb Hintz (1808-1876). This way the shop in Kolozsvár/Cluj ended up to the Hintz family. Their son György Hintz jr. (1840-1890) continued the family business in the city. The article mentions some other Mauksch members and goes in more biographical details but it concentrates more on those who were engaged in the medical profession.

The article is footnoted and i'm sure the Hintz family's previous history is also well documented, primer sources must be in German, Hungarian and Latin.
Thank You, tulun!

As usual, straightforward and informative ...

Question: there's a Thomas Mauksch (naturalist, botanist: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Mauksch). Do You think it's the same family ?
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,816
Western Eurasia
#25
Thank You, tulun!

As usual, straightforward and informative ...

Question: there's a Thomas Mauksch (naturalist, botanist: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Mauksch). Do You think it's the same family ?
looks very likely since he is from Késmárk too, but i don't know how distant, maybe a cousin or something. Btw most extant church books for Slovakia are online on the Mormon site familysearch.org , so regarding those areas family tree research can be often done comfortably from chair even as far back sometimes as the second half of 17th- and 18th century. :) Sadly the same can't be said about familytree research in Transylvania, their church books are still not online, so that often requires field work.

https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1554443?collectionNameFilter=false

the indexing is i think only show birth records and not always reliable, if the indexer could spell out the names well... but the images of the churchbooks are also online, and those also include church books covering marriage and death records.

https://familysearch.org/search/ima....org/recapi/sord/collection/1554443/waypoints

https://familysearch.org/search/image/index?owc=9P3G-16D:107654101,109075401,116536801?cc=1554443

But the thread starter is luckier with this family since there also seems to be lot of secondary literature, lot of archival material after them. it would be harder with a peasant family and a common name. :D

there are also like a thousand hits for this family name on the Hungarian Cultural Heritage Portal database
https://hungaricana.hu/en/search/results/?list=eyJxdWVyeSI6ICJtYXVrc2NoIn0
 
Last edited:
Oct 2013
14,443
Europix
#26
...
But the thread starter is luckier with this family since there also seems to be lot of secondary literature, lot of archival material after them. it would be harder with a peasant family and a common name. :D
You said it!

In fact it's a less known, but important family. And wealthy! I found out that they owned for some time another pharmacy in Bistriz/Bistrita/Beszterce for a couple of generations.

The oldest pharmacy of Cluj-Napoca was founded in 1573, it was the property of the town and for 162 years it was the only one, until the founding of the second pharmacy by the Jesuits in 1735.

The pharmacy was privatized in 1727, the first owner being Sámuel Schwartz. After his death in 1749, his widow hired Tóbiás Mauksch, as provisor, the nephew of the deceased, who bought the pharmacy after three years, in 1752. Mauksch wrote the famous „Instructio”, often mentioned in the literature, about a chemist’s obligations and conduct.

The pharmacy became the property of György Hintz (1840-1890) in 1863, by the fact that his father, evangelical priest, Georg Gottlieb Hintz was married to the daughter of Johann Martin: Augusta Mathilda Mauksch. He is the first chemist from Transylvania to obtain the title of Doctor. He became professor of pharmacy in 1872 at the newly founded Hungarian Royal University from Cluj.

The St. George pharmacy remains in the property of Hintz family, passing from father to son, until its nationalization in 1949. It is a Museum of History of Pharmacy now.
BTW, I visited their pharmacy (now a museum) a couple of Years ago in Cluj/Kolozsvàr. Very, very interesting. Small, but a real gem. I have rarely been in a museum/memorial house that "dive" You in the atmosphere of past times so strongly.

And at some 10 minutes walk, there's a pharmacy (still running as a pharmacy) that has practically all the original furniture from when it opened (late 19th c, if I am not wrong), ordered in Wien, I think.

I suppose You can easily guess the profession of my guiding friend :D
 
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Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,976
Lorraine tudesque
#30
Probably so.

The book on flowers is full of quotes. Already in the preface there are fragments from Schilller and Goethe.
Well Herder was both an Illuminati and a Freemason. That could explain the Pyramid.

The Griffon is a symbole in Alchemy but in this case just a symbole of a Pharmacist. But next time in Klausenburg I will have a look on this.
 

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