Henry VII: How a Usurper King Established a Dynasty

Jul 2018
16
England
#3
Good article. Do I detect an anti-Tudor attitude?
Thanks!

I'm not anti-Tudor, I find the Tudors extremely interesting and I think that Henry VII was one of the best English kings in history when it comes to making financial progress. Any negatives in the article were merely to balance out the positive and present certain counterarguments.
 
Sep 2014
1,200
Queens, NYC
#6
May I get some clarification?

I've never read the that Henry VII backdated the battle of Bosworth. He declared his ascension to throne to be August 21, 1485 (one day before Bosworth).

The enclosures did not, so far as I know, occur largely during the Wars of the Roses-though they started during that period. They accelerated during the reign of Henry VII, it is to his discredit that he allowed them.

"Earning" as applied to a king, seems a bit--generous(?) How about "extracting"?
 
Jul 2018
16
England
#7
May I get some clarification?

I've never read the that Henry VII backdated the battle of Bosworth. He declared his ascension to throne to be August 21, 1485 (one day before Bosworth).

The enclosures did not, so far as I know, occur largely during the Wars of the Roses-though they started during that period. They accelerated during the reign of Henry VII, it is to his discredit that he allowed them.

"Earning" as applied to a king, seems a bit--generous(?) How about "extracting"?

Your first point is correct and I've amended the article. Enclosure did happen quite a lot during the Wars of the Roses, although it's most notable during the reign of Edward VI.

I use the word "earned" just out of preference and I can certainly understand why "extracting" or some other word may be better.
 

Pendennis

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,386
Kirkcaldy, Scotland
#8
Ah dear 'ole Hery VII once one of favourite final exam question essay topics because he was an interesting guy no doubt.
He had a sense of humour too. One of the would be usurpers to his throne -Lambert Simnel I think -or was it Perkin Warbeck? was sent by Henry to work as a scullion in the royal kitchens.for the rest of his days-better than being hung drawn and quartered by far.
Alas, Henry's careful financial plans and husbandry were ruined by his profligate son Henry VIII whose debasing of the English coinage and squandering the revenues from confiscated monastries led to the great Tudor inflation,
Love the irony of the fact that before he embarked on the theological and financial rape of the English Catholic church in the 1530's one of the Popes endowed Henry VIII with the title 'Fidie Defensor'='Defender of the Faith' which our present monarch still holds.
 
Aug 2015
2,359
uk
#10
Re Henry VIII; yes he did spend lots of money, but he did pretty much found the royl navy and also invested it quite a number of very impressive (even to this day) artillery forts, making invasion from France or Spain much less likely. Although he certainly wasn't a nice man - but I think the same can be said for all the Tudors.

As for Yorkist comebacks, there were a number of attempted cues, mainly using the 'pretenders' (Edward IV's son?). But by this stage the country was tired after decades of wars for the throne.
 

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