HG Wells, The Time Machine

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
#1
Written by H.G. Wells, in 1895, The Time Machine struck an immediate chord with its effort to put Victorian society in the crosshairs by showing what could happen to humanity in the future, if we let ourselves become slaves to our own leisure.

http://www.planetpdf.com/planetpdf/pdfs/free_ebooks/The_Time_Machine_T.pdf
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Last edited:
Jan 2009
1,119
#2
So the book is about taking the English Class divisions to their (il)logical conclusion.

The Working classes becoming ugly and cannibalistic, devouring the beautiful, but useless, Upper class children while keeping the machinery of civilization still operating.

To be honest, the Morlocks should be considered the heroes of the story. I think the Inventor picked the wrong side to support.
 

Toltec

Ad Honorem
Apr 2008
7,923
Hyperborea
#5
The student of Darwin's Bulldog Thomas Huxley and a member of the Fabian Society combines these two elements in a book that satirises the idol aristocracy by turning them into the food of the working classes thanks to evolution.

He's making a point about evolution which still wounld'nt have been widely accepted back then and his socialist politics. He also alledgedly anticipates WWII and poses the philosophical dilemma, are we evolving? Something still not solved today.
 

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
#6
The student of Darwin's Bulldog Thomas Huxley and a member of the Fabian Society combines these two elements in a book that satirises the idol aristocracy by turning them into the food of the working classes thanks to evolution.

He's making a point about evolution which still wounld'nt have been widely accepted back then and his socialist politics. He also alledgedly anticipates WWII and poses the philosophical dilemma, are we evolving? Something still not solved today.
I have read that as well, and it seems that the social Darwanism aspect is just there to smack us in the face. My question is, is it really meant as just the Upper Classes, or is it for everyone in general that partakes of anything that makes life easier? Was there an emerging Middle Class yet in Wells time, or was is still primarily a "haves and haves not society?"
 

Toltec

Ad Honorem
Apr 2008
7,923
Hyperborea
#7
My guess as I wrote is his socialist politics answers that. Most Fabians were middle class, so I'm guessing he excludes them.
 

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
#8
So basically, we have a "collective", farming the "elite"....not too subtle H.G., not too subtle.


I had notes on another representation of the Morlocks and Eloi, and of course now I can't find them...aaarrrrgghh! I was so busy furthering the cause of capatalism yesterday that I believe I have truly lost my marbles.
 

Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
#9
The Working classes becoming ugly and cannibalistic, devouring the beautiful, but useless, Upper class children while keeping the machinery of civilization still operating.

To be honest, the Morlocks should be considered the heroes of the story. I think the Inventor picked the wrong side to support.
Are the Morlocks cannibals though? If, as it seems, the Morlocks and the Eloi have evolved into separate species, then the Morlocks are actually eating a related species, not their own, and so are not cannibals. The Eloi have degenerated into what appears to be a sub-human level of intelligence, so just as some justify harvesting and eating cetacean species, perhaps the Morlocks may be justified in harvesting and eating the Eloi. After all, that is really the only reason the Eloi even continue to exist. Without the husbandry of the Morlocks, they would go extinct; it seems they're not being capable of surviving on their own.

I don't think that the Morlocks should be considered heroes though. They are quite as degenerate as the Eloi, and apparently have lost the capability of supporting a higher culture. Nowhere is there any mention of Morlock art or scientific inquiry; they seem to be only somewhat more intelligent than their livestock.
 

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