HG Wells: War of the Worlds

Triceratops

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
3,003
Late Cretaceous
Trailer for George Pal's 1953 film;

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9T9f3UbGuo[/ame]
 
Nov 2014
802
Maryland
Wonderful -- I watched the trailer. Useful to see how different film values were, not just film technology, 60 years ago.
 

Spartacuss

Ad Honorem
Jul 2010
7,575
Georgia, USA
This was my first real introduction to the story as a kid and still my favorite movie version so far. I think I didn't read the book until I was in high school or so, might have to dig it out and read it again.
I even liked the TV series that was a "sequel" to the 1953 film that came out in the late 80's.
When you read the book, did you catch the hostility towards Jews and the clergy? He also wasn't too kind about what he perceives a lack of moral fiber in the middle and working classes when a national disaster occurs.
 

Collingwood

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
2,544
U.K.
I hadn't heard of this Wells novel:

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Tono-Bungay-Penguin-Classics-H-G-Wells/dp/0141441119/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1431545686&sr=1-6&keywords=h+g+wells+penguin"]Tono-Bungay (Penguin Classics): H.G. Wells, Edward Mendelson, Patrick Parrinder: 9780141441115: Amazon.com: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51-AYTqhrkL.@@AMEPARAM@@51-AYTqhrkL[/ame]

Well I never, you learn something new every- when you dip into Amazon and call up the Penguin Classics
 

Fire_Raven

Ad Honorem
Jul 2010
2,776
Oregon
When you read the book, did you catch the hostility towards Jews and the clergy? He also wasn't too kind about what he perceives a lack of moral fiber in the middle and working classes when a national disaster occurs.
It's been at least 20 yrs since I read it so I only have vague memories of the book that I can clearly differentiate from other versions that I've seen/heard. I'll will be on the lookout for that when I read it again.
 

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
I must recommend The League of Extraordinary Gentleman, Vol 2., as it deal with how the 'Martians' are driven from Mars, by John Carter and Gulliver Jones, and the subsequent War on Earth. It is such a fantastic work, bringing so many different characters together into one volume.
 

Davidius

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
4,993
Pillium
Wells seems to do the polar opposite of William Blake, he sees the beauty through this character, the foreman, in the industrial revolution. Not just the slag and soot and dirt and scorched land around the site of the blast furnaces and smelting works but the poetry of the processes and colours.
He does something very similar in his short story 'Lord of the Dynamos' in which the power and complexity of an electrical dynamo are accorded divine status by an ignorant immigrant worker. IIRC his description of the machines operation is almost poetic.
Shame it gets spoiled by the racist language and attitudes but 'man of his time' and all that. I still consider Wells one of the greatest writers Britain has produced.
 
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Collingwood

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
2,544
U.K.
He does something very similar in his short story 'Lord of the Dynamos' in which the power and complexity of an electrical dynamo are accorded divine status by an ignorant immigrant worker. IIRC his description of the machines operation is almost poetic.
Shame it gets spoiled by the racist language and attitudes but 'man of his time' and all that. I still consider Wells one of the greatest writers Britain has produced.
Oh gosh, yes, The Lord of the Dynamos, I've completely forgotten it by now, but perhaps because it was childhood reading, that was an advantage, and so I didn't pick up on the racist language.

I've watched a few documentaries, since then, and this might be why I have never gone back to Wells in a big way, some of his views and the fact that I suspect that the language may be dated.

The Penguin Classics tempted but... but I just thought, I've sort of been there once and done all that.
 

Triceratops

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
3,003
Late Cretaceous
Wonderful -- I watched the trailer. Useful to see how different film values were, not just film technology, 60 years ago.
At the end of the Tom Cruise film, the stars of the 1953 film, Gene Barry and Anne Robinson, make a cameo appearance as the grandparents.