Hindu God Ganesha is from Greeks ?

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,334
Australia
#61
Wow! Japanese culture is so rich. Shintoism is such a fantastic philosophy. I love Japan

I recently read some historical drama set in Shogun era Japan and it was absolutely mesmerizing. There was this historical character called Miyamoto Musashi that was amazing
I am STILL pondering some of his philosophy . I will probably never get it as no one has that way of life anymore. But most who practice any of the Japanese sword arts know of him. One time, after a long session on 'rhythm' , by a rather good teacher whose 'special sword training session' I went to , I asked if those rhythms we were examining where what Mushashi was referring to when he wrote ; " Do not attack ho-ho-hum-ho-ho ... attack ho-hum-hum ho- hum. " ... the first time I read that I was ... what the **** ? " :confused:

(The answer was ; "Maybe." )

Some frowned upon him , disdainfully ; "He did not bathe ! " ( a shocking thing in Samurai culture ) ..... he didnt want to get his sword wet .... and it was unthinkable to him to not have it immediately at hand ... such is the problem of remaining 'undefeated ' .

Here is another great novel
Across the Nightingale Floor - Wikipedia

and , if you like movies, I highly recommend ' Twilight Samurai' - an unusual Japanese 'sword movie' , in that the hero gives up status and appearances in order to look after his daughters and crazy mother-in -law. A crazy notion back then , others cant figure out why he does not ; 'Just tie the mad old woman to a post in the yard ." A heart warming and different story.

'Sword of Doom' is another great favorite , more typical slash and blood but with an important inner moral message. And a great insight into the central importance of the sword and its 'principles' in the ' Shogun culture' .

As well as some great sword footage, I love the scenery, and culture depicted ; the villages, gardens, houses, architecture, etc .

(Mushashi actually gave up the sword in latter life and fought with 'two wooden sticks' , remaining undefeated . )





..... " evil mind - evil sword "



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Likes: Kadi
Oct 2018
705
Adelaide south Australia
#62
WOW! Ganesh is my favourite because he is so benign, yet wise.

From when was he worshipped in Japan? A piece I just read traces his Indian origins to as between 4th-7th century bce.

That there is a correlation between an Elephant headed Japanese deity and the Indian Ganesh certainly suggest a common origin.What it does not do is prove that connection. I'm not saying for a second that claim is untrue. I simply ask for published sources.
 
Jun 2017
426
usa
#63
WOW! Ganesh is my favourite because he is so benign, yet wise.

From when was he worshipped in Japan? A piece I just read traces his Indian origins to as between 4th-7th century bce.

That there is a correlation between an Elephant headed Japanese deity and the Indian Ganesh certainly suggest a common origin.What it does not do is prove that connection. I'm not saying for a second that claim is untrue. I simply ask for published sources.

The post does say that the Japanese Ganesha is part of Buddhism. The attire of the Ganesha statue and the statue to its right is how Indians dressed in ancient and medieval times. The bracelet around the upper arms is also part of the Indian dress. Strong indicators that Ganesha went to japan via Buddhism. Strong indicators of Indian origins. The statue on Ganesha's left looks purely japanese.

If I remember correctly other HIndu deities like Saraswathi, Lakshmi, etc are also worshipped in Japan. Saraswathi especially has quite a few temples. All these deities reached Japan via China.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,843
New Delhi, India
#64
Wow! Japanese culture is so rich. Shintoism is such a fantastic philosophy. I love Japan
I recently read some historical drama set in Shogun era Japan and it was absolutely mesmerizing. There was this historical character called Miyamoto Musashi that was amazing
 
Jul 2017
395
Sydney
#65
I am STILL pondering some of his philosophy . I will probably never get it as no one has that way of life anymore. But most who practice any of the Japanese sword arts know of him. One time, after a long session on 'rhythm' , by a rather good teacher whose 'special sword training session' I went to , I asked if those rhythms we were examining where what Mushashi was referring to when he wrote ; " Do not attack ho-ho-hum-ho-ho ... attack ho-hum-hum ho- hum. " ... the first time I read that I was ... what the **** ? " :confused:

(The answer was ; "Maybe." )

Some frowned upon him , disdainfully ; "He did not bathe ! " ( a shocking thing in Samurai culture ) ..... he didnt want to get his sword wet .... and it was unthinkable to him to not have it immediately at hand ... such is the problem of remaining 'undefeated ' .

Here is another great novel
Across the Nightingale Floor - Wikipedia

and , if you like movies, I highly recommend ' Twilight Samurai' - an unusual Japanese 'sword movie' , in that the hero gives up status and appearances in order to look after his daughters and crazy mother-in -law. A crazy notion back then , others cant figure out why he does not ; 'Just tie the mad old woman to a post in the yard ." A heart warming and different story.

'Sword of Doom' is another great favorite , more typical slash and blood but with an important inner moral message. And a great insight into the central importance of the sword and its 'principles' in the ' Shogun culture' .

As well as some great sword footage, I love the scenery, and culture depicted ; the villages, gardens, houses, architecture, etc .

(Mushashi actually gave up the sword in latter life and fought with 'two wooden sticks' , remaining undefeated . )





..... " evil mind - evil sword "



View attachment 14321
Thanks for all the info and links :) I watched these clips and they're amazing. I'm now searching for these movies and if I'm unable to find them on YouTube, I'll see if they are on Netflix.

I watched a Japanese movie called 'after the rain' in English today and that was pretty good as well
 
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