Historical accuracy of HBO's miniseries "Chernobyl"

Apr 2019
171
Europe
There is a dialogue in HBO's "Chernobyl" when Shcherbina tells Legasov that Chernobyl used to be an ethnically Polish town until Stalin forced the Poles out.

How nice that they mentioned our "Kresy" and while it is accurate that Stalin forced Poles out of Eastern Europe, I'm not sure it applies specifically to Chernobyl.

AFAIK the town of Chernobyl itself was never majority Polish (even if taking into account only the Non-Jewish part of its population, it was mostly East Slavic).

But I get why they included this dialogue, it is true in a broader sense (if we apply it to Former Eastern Polish Lands in general, not specifically to Chernobyl).

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The dialogue also indicates that Stalin started forcing Poles out of Chernobyl before WW2 - so maybe they are referring to the Polish Operation of the NKVD?:

Polish Operation of the NKVD - Wikipedia
 
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Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
There is a dialogue in HBO's "Chernobyl" when Shcherbina tells Legasov that Chernobyl used to be an ethnically Polish town until Stalin forced the Poles out.

How nice that they mentioned our "Kresy" and while it is accurate that Stalin forced Poles out of Eastern Europe, I'm not sure it applies specifically to Chernobyl.

AFAIK the town of Chernobyl itself was never majority Polish (even if taking into account only the Non-Jewish part of its population, it was mostly East Slavic).

But I get why they included this dialogue, it is true in a broader sense (if we apply it to Former Eastern Polish Lands in general, not specifically to Chernobyl).
I believe the immediate area around Chernobyl is considered by many the urheimat of the proto Slavs?
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
Yes, but Poles are not Proto-Slavs. At least not any more than Ukrainians, Belarusians or Russians are Proto-Slavs.
Yes, of course. East Slavs, West Slavs, South Slavs. Historically they were generally one group or tribe who migrated out of the area around Chernobyl at some point. Or at least that is what many believe, as Chernobyl is in the province of Pryp'yat', as in the Pryp'yat' marshes. Correct?
 
Apr 2019
171
Europe
There was also that scene when 82-year old babushka was remembering her life and she mentioned Holodomor and Soviet crimes, but not German crimes from 1941-1945.

So it looks like there are elements of Anti-Russian propaganda in this mini-series.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
There was also that scene when 82-year old babushka was remembering her life and she mentioned Holodomor and Soviet crimes, but not German crimes from 1941-1945.

So it looks like there are elements of Anti-Russian propaganda in this mini-series.
Maybe she was speaking experientially, that is, maybe she experienced those things personally but not the Nazi crimes in her life?
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,550
Republika Srpska
I believe Stalin did deport Chernobyl's Poles to Central Asia, but I do not know if the city had a Polish majority or whether the Poles were simply a minority.
 
Nov 2016
42
Romania
There was also that scene when 82-year old babushka was remembering her life and she mentioned Holodomor and Soviet crimes, but not German crimes from 1941-1945.

So it looks like there are elements of Anti-Russian propaganda in this mini-series.
I am pretty sure she talks both of the "russian boys " and the "german boys".
 
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Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,741
There was also that scene when 82-year old babushka was remembering her life and she mentioned Holodomor and Soviet crimes, but not German crimes from 1941-1945.

So it looks like there are elements of Anti-Russian propaganda in this mini-series.
Only if Russian history is "anti-Russian".

But of course these days actual Russian history IS precisely "anti-Russian", according to the principles set down by the Russian government.

Which is why Russians couldn't make a TV-series like "Chernobyl".
 
Sep 2016
1,271
Georgia
Only if Russian history is "anti-Russian".

But of course these days actual Russian history IS precisely "anti-Russian", according to the principles set down by the Russian government.

Which is why Russians couldn't make a TV-series like "Chernobyl".
German crimes on Eastern front are very underrepresented in Western media. Far more people in the West know about Stalin purges, Holodomor and etc. than about genocide of Slavs.

Russians also made plenty of movies, tv-series and documentaries about ,, evil '' Soviet Union in the 1990's and early 2000's. I was there and witnessed it all. Now though, Putin's machine tries to have a different rhetoric.

All of the ,, shitting on USSR '' was a strong contrast with what life was for average Russians in 1990's. They told them about terrible regime, but their lives only became worse without Soviet Union.