Historical events where timing made a huge difference

Feb 2016
540
ROK
#11
EDIT: In the YouTube video, the Akagi was hit after the Kaga and the Soryu. Other records say that the Akagi was hit at nearly the same time as the Kaga. Mitsuo Fuchida's and Masatake Okumiya's Midway is unclear about this. It took longer for the Akagi to be put out of action after getting hit. All three were hit within a short period of time.
 
Last edited:
Likes: Futurist

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
13,734
Navan, Ireland
#13
One may be the battle of Isandlwana, the Zulus attacked with half the British force out of the camp.

Now many claim this as evidence of Zulu genius, in reality it was pure luck.

With twice the number of redcoats etc made all the difference?

Or does it mean more dead redcoats and more dead Zulu?
 
Likes: Futurist

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,658
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#14
Two events that spring to my mind are the Roman capture of a Punic ship washed ashore on Sicily and the typhoon that sunk the Mongol invasion of Japan.
Some historians are skeptical about how necessary a Punic shipwreck was. Teh Romans had contact with many Mediterraneoan states which had warships and could certainly learn how to build warships by acquiring plans and shipwrights.
 
Likes: Futurist
Aug 2011
107
The Castle Anthrax
#15
Agreed. They most certainly would have gained the technology at some point. However, the timing of the capture was critical for the Romans.
 
Nov 2010
7,404
Cornwall
#16
One may be the battle of Isandlwana, the Zulus attacked with half the British force out of the camp.

Now many claim this as evidence of Zulu genius, in reality it was pure luck.

With twice the number of redcoats etc made all the difference?

Or does it mean more dead redcoats and more dead Zulu?
I guess you could argue this signalled the destruction of the Zulu armies in the near future.
 
Likes: Futurist

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
13,734
Navan, Ireland
#17
I guess you could argue this signalled the destruction of the Zulu armies in the near future.

the invasion wasn't sanctioned by London but after the humiliation of the defeat the British had to win the war.

Also it increased the confidence of the Zulu warriors so that they seemed to believe (against their Kings instructions and the defeat at Rorkes Drift) they could charge redcoats in established positions -- they couldn't and it cost them.
 
Oct 2015
345
Belfast
#19
Which historical events were there where timing made a huge difference?



-Timing isn't as tight here as it is in the three cases above, but had a member of the Austro-Hungarian royal family been assassinated in Sarajevo just a couple of years (or more) after 1914, it is possible that Germany would have refrained from giving Austria-Hungary a blank check to go to war against Serbia due to the very real possibility that Germany would have felt much less confident about winning a Great War in the late 1910s and afterwards than it would have been in 1914. In turn, this would mean that such an assassination might very well have not triggered a Great War had it occurred just a couple of years later or more.

Anyway, which other cases can you think of where timing made a huge difference?
Arch Duke Ferdinand doesn't instruct his driver to take a detour to visit the wounded in hospital after one of the assassination attempts. So he isn't driven into Gavrilo Princip's path.

The lucky torpedo strike that crippled the Bismarck's steering gear.
 
Likes: Futurist
Oct 2016
1,040
Merryland
#20
JFK's driver doesn't loop around Elm Street

IIRC there was a Napoleon battle in which he directed his general (Ney?) to attack no later than nine; the general was lined up ready to go at eight but thought he was supposed to wait til nine, which gave the enemy time to prepare. he should have attacked as soon as possible.
 

Similar History Discussions