Historical Figures and Who Should Play Them

Sep 2016
1,266
Georgia
Idd, the language should be the one of the primary viewing audience, the Americans in the case of Hollywood in order they to be able to understand it. Imagine for the sake of 'historical accuracy' a movie about the Conqueror where actors speak Norman French and Old English reconstructed by the way since they are both dead lingvae. We all gonna need subtitles. Well, we are ok with these on this continent, but they are not.
I understand that. However, people shouldn't than complain that much about accent of historical figures. I've seen tons of criticism on Colin Farrell not having Greek accent and etc.
 

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
3,925
Bulgaria
I understand that. However, people shouldn't than complain that much about accent of historical figures. I've seen tons of criticism on Colin Farrell not having Greek accent and etc.
Modern Greek accent? Quite funny idd. Actually his language was a Dorian dialect, variations of it spoken by the Spartans in Peloponnesus, also by their neighbours the Epirotes and some of Magna Greacia, for example in Neseber, settled by Dorians from Megara. But let's keep it simple :)
 
Jan 2019
297
Montreal, QC
Rufus Sewell was absolutely brilliant as Charles II in "The Power and the Passion."


It's actually an amazing show overall. There are some inaccuracies, of course, and many figures had to be excluded, but it is the best historical drama I have seen. The costumes, the production value, the history are sublime. They payed a lot of attention to the Whig ascendancy, the Exclusion Crisis, Monmouth, and the dynamic between Charles and James, which was perhaps my favourite part of the show. I also quite enjoyed the amount of temper tantrums that James had, which is also very accurate. Among these included him throwing a tennis racket at Charles, screaming at the Privy Council (understandable), and pitching a fit about his marriage to Anne Hyde, the first Duchess of York.

It's a bit smutty - it is the Restoration, after all - but it's nothing like "Versailles" level smut. If you can, I highly recommend watching the series (four-part). The treatment of James is fair.
 
Mar 2017
870
Colorado
I don't like posh accents for historical figures as a rule, but British accents can be cleverly used to show class distinction in historical pieces. Every English speaker in the world can identify royalty with a posh accent, and commoners and thieves with the accents from Welsh miners to cockneys (don't mean any implied bigotry here, I'm talking about theatrical use).

I don't think the "world" of English speakers has the same sensitivity to American accents. Presidents have spoken with Texas accents. Southern accents don't really imply anything. The strong NJ/NY street accents just don't work for historical pieces ... too modern? Bostonian accents can be elite or common. New England fisher-folk? "Quaint"

IMHO: British accents are easier to use in historic epics. Remember the old BBC series "Poldark" ... the miner's accents were very thick and clearly differentiated them as lower class. I'm not from there and don't know how accurate the portrayal was, but I knew who had money & status and who didn't by their speech.

 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
Yep.

Carried to logical absurdity by Mel Gibson . I mean, making that pornographically violent 'Passion of The Christ' In Aramaic.

I love the more recent practice of having 'commoners' speak with a working class/ rough accent. Eg Titus Pulo in 'Rome' and Bronn in 'Game of Thrones'

I also liked the way English was constructed for "Spartacus'; made it sound 'old' by removing verbs or contracting sentences. Clever idea..

eg" Gratitude" as a response or "give voice to thought----".
 
Oct 2018
1,490
Sydney
Rufus Sewell was absolutely brilliant as Charles II in "The Power and the Passion."


It's actually an amazing show overall. There are some inaccuracies, of course, and many figures had to be excluded, but it is the best historical drama I have seen. The costumes, the production value, the history are sublime. They payed a lot of attention to the Whig ascendancy, the Exclusion Crisis, Monmouth, and the dynamic between Charles and James, which was perhaps my favourite part of the show. I also quite enjoyed the amount of temper tantrums that James had, which is also very accurate. Among these included him throwing a tennis racket at Charles, screaming at the Privy Council (understandable), and pitching a fit about his marriage to Anne Hyde, the first Duchess of York.

It's a bit smutty - it is the Restoration, after all - but it's nothing like "Versailles" level smut. If you can, I highly recommend watching the series (four-part). The treatment of James is fair.
I've seen it before, and it's brilliant.
 
Oct 2018
1,490
Sydney
Yep.

Carried to logical absurdity by Mel Gibson . I mean, making that pornographically violent 'Passion of The Christ' In Aramaic.

I love the more recent practice of having 'commoners' speak with a working class/ rough accent. Eg Titus Pulo in 'Rome' and Bronn in 'Game of Thrones'

I also liked the way English was constructed for "Spartacus'; made it sound 'old' by removing verbs or contracting sentences. Clever idea..

eg" Gratitude" as a response or "give voice to thought----".
I really enjoyed the use of Aramaic, as I did the use of Mayan for Apocalypto.
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
I really enjoyed the use of Aramaic, as I did the use of Mayan for Apocalypto.

I'm glad to learn that you got pleasure from 2 truly dreadful films

I got the point of "The Passion Of The Christ" being made in Aramaic ;( the Vatican loved it) However, I think it's a bit precious.

As for Apocalypto ,I don't know what he was thinking. Filming the movie in Mayan implies the film is historically accurate, which it ain't.