Historical works on Pontius Pilate?

Jan 2019
259
Montreal, QC
#1
Hello all,

My term paper for my ancient Roman history class is on Pontius Pilate. I plan on looking at the historical Pilate, versus the Pilate of faith. My thesis isn't much more concise than this at the moment. I've found only one source on historical Pilate so far (Pontius Pilate in history and interpretation by Helen K. Bond), and I'm curious if there are any more. I am aware of Josephus insofar as primary sources, but at the moment, I am more curious about secondary sources.

Many thanks,

-DoY
 
Likes: Futurist

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
#3
Hello all,

My term paper for my ancient Roman history class is on Pontius Pilate. I plan on looking at the historical Pilate, versus the Pilate of faith. My thesis isn't much more concise than this at the moment. I've found only one source on historical Pilate so far (Pontius Pilate in history and interpretation by Helen K. Bond), and I'm curious if there are any more. I am aware of Josephus insofar as primary sources, but at the moment, I am more curious about secondary sources.

Many thanks,

-DoY
There are some inscriptions with Pontius Pilates name. Also Philo of Alexandria, but those should be considered primary sources.rsthdt than secondary.
 
Likes: Futurist
Nov 2016
759
Germany
#4
Here is a thread opener of mine, touching the subject:

The Jesus-Pilate-Scene in Mk 15 - just an illogical Fairy Tale?

(1)
The historically unproven custom of the release of a prisoner mentioned in v.6 is, in the opinion of most historians, to be regarded as Mark's invention, the deeper meaning of which is subsequently discussed in the Barabbas context.


(2)
On Pilatus´ conciliatory behaviour towards Jesus: It is unlikely that the procurator will not sentence to death someone who, seemlingly with a rebellious intent, claims the title ´King of the Jews´ (Mk 15:2), and is to be seen as an attempt by the evangelist to morally exonerate the Roman authorities. Not quite as implausible is Pilatus´'s soft behavior towards the Jewish crowd. In one case Pilate gave in to the pressure of a crowd, even if this contradicted his violent nature (Ant. 18,55f.). However, this case is not really comparable to the Mark scene and thus is by no means sufficient to support the authenticity of the Jesus-Pilate scene; I already mentioned two reasons: the unhistorical custom of the release and Pilatus´ unbelievable conciliatoriness towards Jesus.


(...)

One of those theories is:

In the earliest Christian tradition, the legend circulated that the Jewish people in Jerusalem, admiring Jesus, called in vain for the release of Jesus, who was nicknamed ´Son of the Father´ (Barabbas). This demand was not made in connection with an annual amnesty, as described in Mk, but happened spontaneously. When, as Christianity spread into the Roman Empire, it became necessary to adapt its original legend to a Roman public, the Roman Pilate, who was responsible for the execution of Jesus, had to be exonerated and the blame shifted to a third party, the Jews. The Jewish demand for the release of Jesus Barabbas was not completely eradicated. Rather, this figure was split into a good and an evil Jesus Barabbas (robber). The evil Barabbas is wished free from captivity by the now likewise ´evil´ Jews and the good one is killed at their request. Pilate thus looks innocent.
 
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#5
Fun fact. The administration of the emperor Maximinus Daza forged the Acts of Pilate during their persecution of the Christians.

Eusebius, Historia Ecclesiastica 9.5.1: Having therefore forged Acts of Pilate and our Saviour full of every kind of blasphemy against Christ, they sent them with the emperor's approval to the whole of the empire subject to him, with written commands that they should be openly posted to the view of all in every place, both in country and city, and that the schoolmasters should give them to their scholars, instead of their customary lessons, to be studied and learned by heart.

9.7.1: The children in the schools had daily in their mouths the names of Jesus and Pilate, and the Acts which had been forged in wanton insolence.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,702
SoCal
#6
Hello all,

My term paper for my ancient Roman history class is on Pontius Pilate. I plan on looking at the historical Pilate, versus the Pilate of faith. My thesis isn't much more concise than this at the moment. I've found only one source on historical Pilate so far (Pontius Pilate in history and interpretation by Helen K. Bond), and I'm curious if there are any more. I am aware of Josephus insofar as primary sources, but at the moment, I am more curious about secondary sources.

Many thanks,

-DoY
I don't know if these two books will help you for your assignment, but I might as well post them here anyway:

Pontius Pilate | W. W. Norton & Company

Nonfiction Book Review: Pontius Pilate by Ann Wroe, Author Random House (NY) $26.95 (432p) ISBN 978-0-375-50305-4
 

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