History books by previous "losers"

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,338
Florania
#1
The saying "history is written by victors" is almost cliche; previously, the losers are either subjugated or eliminated.
When subjugation is overthrown, as in the case of Africa, history is being rewritten. In this case, new victors emerged.
In the case where the domination is not overthrown outright, as in the case of the Americas, the voice of the aboriginal people is being heard, and they are writing their history books.
How is history being rewritten?
How often does domination and subjugation switch?
 

Fantasus

Ad Honorem
Jan 2012
2,381
Northern part of European lowland
#2
The saying "history is written by victors" is almost cliche; previously, the losers are either subjugated or eliminated.
When subjugation is overthrown, as in the case of Africa, history is being rewritten. In this case, new victors emerged.
In the case where the domination is not overthrown outright, as in the case of the Americas, the voice of the aboriginal people is being heard, and they are writing their history books.
How is history being rewritten?
How often does domination and subjugation switch?
Cliche, yes. But is it true? Not always. German Historians did not stay iddle. And for other nations experiencing big defeat iwitin the last century I don' t think their historians have been pushed aside.Did the victors of the Great war that ended 100 years ago forbid the losers versions? No german histories? No Austrian ones? Can't turkish historians write whatever they want, and if not, is it their own government that decide? Did noone from the US south ever wrkte with some understanding for the confederates? Most old nations have record of defeats and, sometimes victories. What should prevent their historians? Shame?
 
Aug 2018
34
Nowhere, yet everywhere
#3
The saying "history is written by victors" is almost cliche; previously, the losers are either subjugated or eliminated.
When subjugation is overthrown, as in the case of Africa, history is being rewritten. In this case, new victors emerged.
In the case where the domination is not overthrown outright, as in the case of the Americas, the voice of the aboriginal people is being heard, and they are writing their history books.
How is history being rewritten?
How often does domination and subjugation switch?

It seems western history suffers from this most. There are those who say the historical timelines may be completely out of line with real events and figures. For example, there are Roman coins of emperors that once were declared fiction, but now revisions say that they may have existed.



Western history is screwy with the victor problem and that is why I don't give it much attention. Eastern history seems a little more consistent and better in this regards, though kingdoms like Qin and Sui still have a bad rep.


At least Mao questioned the villainy of Qin and Sui as well as the First Emperor. Even Cao Cao is losing his bad guy characteristic. Liu Bei is no longer the epitome of goodness and morality either.
 

Fantasus

Ad Honorem
Jan 2012
2,381
Northern part of European lowland
#4
The OP mentions the Americas. Here I admit I know little about history written from the point of view of the descendants of the peoples before Columbus ("Indians" calle, though no special relation to India). Including populations of all the Americas and "mixed" those populations could be hundreds of millions. Some of all those people may have written, or done other some other work. Though ancient mesoamericans wrote legends what I have in mind is not least contemporary historians and others ( I would include those writing not only academic works, but also those were legends and the like are mi ed with some part of "real past" as long as not all is completely made up or without any support).
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,338
Florania
#5
The OP mentions the Americas. Here I admit I know little about history written from the point of view of the descendants of the peoples before Columbus ("Indians" calle, though no special relation to India). Including populations of all the Americas and "mixed" those populations could be hundreds of millions. Some of all those people may have written, or done other some other work. Though ancient mesoamericans wrote legends what I have in mind is not least contemporary historians and others ( I would include those writing not only academic works, but also those were legends and the like are mi ed with some part of "real past" as long as not all is completely made up or without any support).
Even the mainstream population may reject previously respected historical figures; the case of bashing John A. Macdonald is a good example.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,338
Florania
#6
It seems western history suffers from this most. There are those who say the historical timelines may be completely out of line with real events and figures. For example, there are Roman coins of emperors that once were declared fiction, but now revisions say that they may have existed.



Western history is screwy with the victor problem and that is why I don't give it much attention. Eastern history seems a little more consistent and better in this regards, though kingdoms like Qin and Sui still have a bad rep.


At least Mao questioned the villainy of Qin and Sui as well as the First Emperor. Even Cao Cao is losing his bad guy characteristic. Liu Bei is no longer the epitome of goodness and morality either.
Romance of Three Kingdoms (三国演义) has serious impacts on public perceptions of figures such as Liu Bei, Cao Cao, Zhuge Liang, Guan Yu, or more.
It is also one of the most fertile field for alternative history novels.
One of the finest is called 《大汉帝国风云录》 (The Stormy Record of the Great Han Empire).
 

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