History of Indo-British Cuisine

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,149
India
#1
I was going through the interesting history of Worcestershire sauce and two British chemists trying to replicate the taste of the Indian fish curry but ended up inventing the Worcestershire sauce . Although the ingredients look similar to Indian but sauce don't taste similar to any Indian fish curry.

I would like to know about other 'distinct British' Indo-British fusion cuisine.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,666
Australia
#4
The first Indian restaurant in London in 1810. It closed a year later for lack of business.

Chutney comes to mind ; Chutney - Wikipedia

As a small child (way back) I always remember this being in the cupboard , but no other trace of ' Indian food '


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Usually used to make ;

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( Eventually we got a lot of immigrants, first from Italy and Greece and then Asia . Food began to improve. I also remember being with my mother shopping and the Italian man at the fruitshop having to explain to my mother what these new strange vegetables where - she thought they where a type of cucumber , he told her how to cook them and we had a new adventure at dinner that night :D

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specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,666
Australia
#5
Chicken tikka masala.
PSHAW ! How dare you Sir !

" That’s the accepted story of chicken tikka masala, retold in anecdotes and articles time and again. It’s such an article of faith—Ali Asif, the current manager of Shish Mahal, affirms its authenticity—that five years ago, in 2009, it even became the basis of a parliamentary campaign to obtain European Union Protected Designation of Origin status for the dish. A recognition of unparalleled ingredients, knowledge, heritage, or other cultural or technical factors, these designations mark out those cuisines which are quintessential and unparalleled representations of a nation’s food and peoples. So in launching the movement, the then-Glaswegian Member of Parliament (and the first Muslim MP in Britain) Mohamed Sarwar sought to place chicken tikka masala on the same playing field as Arbroath Smokies, Cornish Clotted Cream, Melton Mowbray Pork Pies, and Welsh Lamb. He was also trying to mark out a space for the official recognition and appreciation of a unique and ubiquitous British culture: that of the increasingly numerous South Asian migrants and their descendants, with feet planted firmly, if to varied degrees, in the Isles and in the Subcontinent. Too bad for him, chicken tikka masala turned out to be a contentious and flighty peg to hang this heavy task upon, and the story itself—the one I just told you about—turned out to be bollocks. "

Who owns Chicken Tikka Masala?

I challenge you to debate in the Indian History sub-forum .... where you shall be chastised in broken unclear English with uncertain meaning, interpaced with Vedic quotes, insistence, strange 'logic' and for cultural misappropriation by the INMCTOOIP theory people

(Indian Nationalist Movement Chicken Tikka Out of India Party )
 

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