History of mankind if seawater were not "salted"

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,768
Las Vegas, NV USA
#2
The early oceans were not very salty. They became more saline as dissolved salts (mostly NaCl) washed down from the continents over several billion years. It's hard to see how this process could not have happened. In the absence of water, life as we know it is impossible . If there is dry land and rocks, there is going to be various kinds of salts including common table salt.
 
Last edited:
Jun 2015
5,567
UK
#3
Shipwrecked people wouldn't die...

All fish would be freshwater fish, so no tuna or cod as we know them now.

Though it could mean that species of fish or marine life would not have any differentiation between the oceans and internal waterways. So if sharks still existed, they would swim into estuaries, or as far as they could inland to find prey.

There may be more salmon-esque species, who live/spawn in rivers, but live in the seas.
 

kazeuma

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,366
#4
One of first chemical experiments to extract gold from sea-water lead to the accidental discovery of "hydrogen". If salt and other atoms did not dissolve into the ocean, the discovery of "hydrogen" would be delayed by ten-to-twenty years. The delay of the discovery of hydrogen would thus delay the invention of the hot air balloon and the airplane by ten-to-twenty years.
 

Davidius

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
4,923
Pillium
#5
You would probably have tribes of ocean dwelling nomads, living off fish and drinking the seawater.
There would probably have been much more trans oceanic migration in the prehistoric eras.


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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,768
Las Vegas, NV USA
#6
You would probably have tribes of ocean dwelling nomads, living off fish and drinking the seawater.
There would probably have been much more trans oceanic migration in the prehistoric eras.


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A world as old as the earth with fresh water seas would have to have little or no land masses for the reasons I already gave (post 2). If there are no land masses there is no land life, therefore no humans. Perhaps some form of more intelligent sea life would develop, possibly from mollusks (fresh water versions of octopuss, squid).

BTW speculative history shouldn't include unnatural SF fantasies IMO. For example, what if wood didn't burn?
 
Last edited:
Jun 2017
422
USA
#7
Probably there would have been much more exploration, much earlier. You could stay on a boat basically indefinitely.

Also there could still be land masses. There are many ways the earth could have developed salt free. We're just lucky it's not full of sulphur or something like that.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,768
Las Vegas, NV USA
#8
Probably there would have been much more exploration, much earlier. You could stay on a boat basically indefinitely.

Also there could still be land masses. There are many ways the earth could have developed salt free. We're just lucky it's not full of sulphur or something like that.
No, there are not many ways that the earth could have developed as did with its advanced life forms. It may not be unique in the entire universe, but the conditons that allow for such life are pretty specific and constraining.

Why does this particilar forum need to discuss science fiction (in this case bad science fiction) when so much interesting real history could have gone in another direction in a perfectly plausible way?
 
Last edited:

Davidius

Ad Honorem
Dec 2010
4,923
Pillium
#9
Why does this particilar forum need to discuss science fiction (in this case bad science fiction) when so much interesting real history could have gone in another direction in a perfectly plausible way?

No one is forcing you to participate.
If you want "real" history then go find some, there is plenty of it on the forum and elsewhere.
There is no need to denigrate the OP or impose your standards on everyone else.
Don't like it? Move on and leave it to those who do.




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tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
12,770
#10
Why does this particilar forum need to discuss science fiction (in this case bad science fiction) when so much interesting real history could have gone in another direction in a perfectly plausible way?
This is an interesting question in its own right as humanity is currently busy looking (and finding) for exoplanets.... Its not completely wild to assume that some of them will only have fresh water....
 

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