History of mankind if seawater were not "salted"

Jun 2017
422
USA
#21
Geez.

Our nervous systems are evolved from those of echinoderms and fish, and those nervous systems could only evolve (in their current form!) in the presence of salted water.

Humans, a species noted for the evolution of the nervous system, could not have arisen without salt in the seas.

It's that straightforward.
Oh please, give me a break.

Organisms as we know it require salt but only a very tiny amount.

There's significant salt in fresh water already, so getting the tiny amount of salt needed is not a real issue and evolution would help us to retain salt better if it were more rare. You know, like it does with potassium for example.

There's many ways that the world could wind up with much less salt without completely disrupting the existence of life, in fact the salt levels of the ocean have wildly fluctuated throughout prehistory.
 
Dec 2011
4,534
Iowa USA
#22
Oh please, give me a break.

Organisms as we know it require salt but only a very tiny amount.

There's significant salt in fresh water already, so getting the tiny amount of salt needed is not a real issue and evolution would help us to retain salt better if it were more rare. You know, like it does with potassium for example.

There's many ways that the world could wind up with much less salt without completely disrupting the existence of life, in fact the salt levels of the ocean have wildly fluctuated throughout prehistory.
Give you a break? :cool: :cool:

You funny guy.

I'll get back to thread in a couple of days. In the meantime it might be interesting to check out the wikipedia page on "The Boring Billion" in earth history, roughly 1.8 to 0.8 Billion Years ago.

Good day.
 
Jun 2017
422
USA
#23
Give you a break? :cool: :cool:

You funny guy.

I'll get back to thread in a couple of days. In the meantime it might be interesting to check out the wikipedia page on "The Boring Billion" in earth history, roughly 1.8 to 0.8 Billion Years ago.

Good day.
Thread is not about how salt works, it's about how world would be like if the ocean had potable water, but you have no idea what you are talking about anyway.

There's many ways less salt could have been on the earth or made it into the sea, or been removed from the ocean. If you can't imagine it then it's your problem not everyone else's so don't drag the thread off into silliness.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,709
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#24
I tend to agree with Kotromanic that humans evolved from land animals that evolved from sea animals that evolved in salt water.

So any changes in ocean salinity would have to happen after our first ancestors left the sea. Otherwise those changes would have had a high probability of preventing our evolution. So changes in ocean salinity would have to happen after about four hundred million years ago. That gives plenty of time for a gradual process to reduce the salinity of the oceans.

That process should have to operate mostly by taking salt out of the oceans somehow. It should involve only a slight reduction in the amount of salt entering the oceans from the land, because a major change in that would probably alter the evolution of life forms on land, including humans.

Maybe aliens from other space set up underwater bases to remove salt form the Earth's oceans faster than more salt enters the oceans, as part of an experiment to see what a fresh water sea is like.

Maybe human would never learn to preserve food with salt. The ocean would not be an important source of salt.

Aquatic life forms are divided into freshwater and saltwater types. Bull sharks are famous as among the few large fish that can live in both fresh and salt water. Aquatic mammals are also divided into fresh and salt water species.

Thus large sea creatures would venture into rivers and lakes far more often than they do in our world.

It is commonly known that that in our world some cetacean species are very large, and that most cetacean species are highly intelligent, perhaps enough to count as intelligent beings and persons.

It is less commonly known that as recently as the 19th century and into the 20th century large wooden seagoing ships were - rarely - accidentally and even deliberately damaged and even sunk in encounters with cetaceans.

The large wooden seagoing ships of the 19th century were much stronger and sturdier than seagoing ships of a few centuries and a few millennia earlier. And those earlier ancient ships of millennia ago ere much stronger and sturdier than the earliest sea craft tens of thousands of years earlier.

Those first prehistoric rafts and canoes and skin boats were often used for long sea voyages to colonize islands and even the continent of Australia that could never be reached by any land bridge. And on those long sea voyages they often passed large cetaceans that could easily smash them but instead ignored them.

But what if alternate reality cetacean equivalents evolved with minds capable of understanding the concept of war, and since they could live in freshwater, may have been attacked by humans far sooner than the first whaling in our reality? Maybe they might have reacted by declaring war on humans, their rule being "sighted sea craft, sank same".

It took thousands of years of sea travel for humans to go from the first fragile sea going reed boats and skin boats and rafts and canoes to iron hulled steamships invulnerable to whale attacks, and such inventions were motivated by the desire to improve long distance sea trade. If there wasn't any long distance sea trade because cetacean attacks made it suicidal to travel by sea, nobody would ever have bothered to invent wooden ships and improve them for thousands of years until iron hulled steamships were invented.

Thus there would be no intercontinental travel until the invention of air travel.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
2,931
Las Vegas, NV USA
#26
^
Well whales are mammals whose ancestors returned to the sea and adapted to salt water, so why not humans? Maybe it already happened!

 
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