history of war in the middle east

Commander

Historum Emeritas
Jun 2006
1,362
Jacksonville, FL
#1
How far back does war in the Middle East go? I am under the impression they are fighting over the right to the Holy Land. I guess both sides think they have a claim to it. Has this fued been going on for thousands of years, before the birth of Jesus? Or has it just escalated since the end of WWII ?
 
Jul 2006
314
Massachusetts
#2
Commander said:
How far back does war in the Middle East go? I am under the impression they are fighting over the right to the Holy Land. I guess both sides think they have a claim to it. Has this fued been going on for thousands of years, before the birth of Jesus? Or has it just escalated since the end of WWII ?
Honestly, I think you could say: "How far back does war in the {insert area of world here} go?". No settled area has been without war for more than a couple generations, except maybe some remote, isolated tribes.

Our present troubles in the mideast are due to oil, and the wealth and power that comes with having it, coupled with a location that is "Holy Land" to three major religions.

Plus, it's damn hot over there, and that always makes people cranky.

Chris--
 
Jul 2006
195
Edinburgh, Scotland
#3
The people in the Middle East have been fighting since it was Persia and mohammed introduced islam into the region. His followers fought with the natives because the natives thought that Islam was a distrurbance in their society. It has always been an area of conflict.
 

Belisarius

Forum Staff
Jun 2006
10,359
U.K.
#4
Professor Phantom said:
The people in the Middle East have been fighting since it was Persia and mohammed introduced islam into the region. His followers fought with the natives because the natives thought that Islam was a distrurbance in their society. It has always been an area of conflict.
The area we call the Holy Land was Roman-Byzantine controlled in the 7th Century AD, when Islam arrived, brought by Arab armies conquering the region. They also conquered the Sassanian Persian Empire which lay further east [Iraq/Iran area].
 
Jun 2006
257
#5
Ur

I put this on another location but I will move it to here...

As Baghdad is torn to shreds, I cannot help but think of this most ancient of lands. It was there between those two rivers that civilization, or what we call what it is we do now-a- days, first raised itself up out of the sands of barbarism. And for those who might one day wonder when "civilization" began. I can tell you that it was the first time a man stood and hurled an insult instead of a rock. Yet for thousands of years, there have been these islands of civilization surrounded by the flood waters of barbarism. All the while the "civilized" have been building dykes, walls and barriers to hold back the ever encroaching and almost irresistible tide that threatens to consume them. And all the while the barbarian has been pressing against the walls trying to batter them down and destroy what is within. That, is in fact the history of human kind. That is exactly what we have been writing and talking about from the start of the whole thing.

Yet for 6500 years - that we have written records for - the land between the Tigres and Euphrates in Ancient Mesopotamia has been laid waste time after time and so it continues to this day. Great cities and grand civilizations have risen and fallen in that part of the world and I am certain that they will continue to do so for as long as there are men.

Among the first of these ancient and great cities was a place called Ur. It thrived for many centuries and was of such importance, that its name is recorded in the oldest of texts and is the city in which Abraham the phrophet is thought to have lived. It was from there that writing, mathematics, science, industry, commerce, advanced agricultural techniques, architecture, art and a myriad of other inventions - including even the wheel - first began. We today are the heirs of that civilization. We are the children of Ur.

It too was destroyed, beaten into dust by war. It was the first of a thousand cities that would one day suffer the same fate. Yet a poem, called the "Lament For Ur", still exits. It could be read today over the ruins of this latest Mesopotamian city just as easily as 6000 years ago. In fact, there never was any reason to put the poem away. We could just pull it out every couple of years and simply change the name of the city....Ur, Lagash, Thebes, Athens, Rome, Carthage, Paris, Berlin and Baghdad. But the story remains the same. As it was for Ur, it now is for Baghdad as it will one day be for another thousand cities.

"For the gods have abandoned us
like migrating birds they have gone
Ur is destroyed, bitter is its lament
The country's blood now fills its holes like hot bronze in a mould
Bodies dissolve like fat in the sun. Our temple is destroyed
Smoke lies on our city like a shroud.
blood flows as the river does
the lamenting of men and women
sadness abounds
Ur is no more"