Hitler's top 10 blunders

Dec 2009
19,933
#81
Maybe the German blunders all along WW2 should be shared by some more people; attributing absolutely all the mistakes to the Führer and all the good decisions to anyone else might be a bit biased, given the understandable general antipathy against Herr Hitler.
 
#82
Maybe the German blunders all along WW2 should be shared by some more people; attributing absolutely all the mistakes to the Führer and all the good decisions to anyone else might be a bit biased, given the understandable general antipathy against Herr Hitler.
As far as Goering is concerned you are right. Big part of Hitler's blunders were actively contributed by Goering: His promise and then failure to destroy the BEF from the air at Dunkirk. He then repeated himself at Stalingrad with the boast that he could deliver 500 tons per day by air.
Except for Goering, hardly anyone else comes to mind who had his own voice even to approach making a blunder of his own.:rolleyes:
 
Aug 2008
718
#83
I'm not sure Goering can be 'credited' with those blunders, although he is certainly justly faulted for facilitating them. Goering's 'skill' (in addition to stealing art) was knowing how to gain favour with Hitler by playing the 'yes man' at opportune moments. Goering does truly 'own' some blunders though, such as cancelling important aircraft development projects that really damaged Germany's efforts starting in the mid-war period.
 
Dec 2009
19,933
#84
As the absolute autocrat that he was, Herr Hitler must be held responsible of all the great strategic decisions of the war (at least for allowing them); however, no chief can care of all details every minute. In a war of such magnitude, even minute details could have had portentous consequences.
 
Mar 2010
33
nr. Toronto, Cda
#85
Gotta be declaring war on the USA - unprovoked. Suicidal!

Closely followed by allowing Spain to stay out of the war, thus exposing the Med to British and Amercian access (North Africa, Italy< Palestine, South of France etc.) He should have forced Spain more actively into the war as an ally or taken Gibraltar by airborne attack.
 
Jan 2008
18,733
Chile, Santiago
#86
Closely followed by allowing Spain to stay out of the war, thus exposing the Med to British and Amercian access (North Africa, Italy< Palestine, South of France etc.) He should have forced Spain more actively into the war as an ally or taken Gibraltar by airborne attack.
A good part of that can be laid at the feet of the brilliant diplomacy of Franklin Roosevelt. During the '30s FDR had taken care to keep the United States out of the war in Spain, and in WWII he quite successfully cashed in the points he had earned from that to lean on Franco to stay neutral. Franco differed from Hitler and Mussolini in being an essentially pragmatic man who knew what side his bread was buttered on.
 
Jul 2009
400
#87
Gotta be declaring war on the USA - unprovoked. Suicidal!

Closely followed by allowing Spain to stay out of the war, thus exposing the Med to British and Amercian access (North Africa, Italy< Palestine, South of France etc.) He should have forced Spain more actively into the war as an ally or taken Gibraltar by airborne attack.
But Spain was still divided. There were many who were anti-Franco and would have fought for the Allies as a resistance members. We already know they helped many Allied POW's escape, and they would have obstructed a lot of Axis matters.

Also, what was to stop Spain being another Italy? The Germans would most likely have had to send troops to prop them up, diverting manpower away from the Russian front.
 

SomeGuy

Ad Honorem
Apr 2010
2,602
California
#88
Spain was in no shape to help the Axis forces. They were decimated by their civil war. Germany would have had to carry them like they did with Italy.

But Hitler's biggest mistake easily had to be invading Russia, especially without having defeated the British first. He should have learned from Napoleon.
 
Dec 2009
19,933
#89
Gotta be declaring war on the USA - unprovoked. Suicidal!
"Unprovoked" might not be the right term here; even if undeclared, the US were already in an overtly hostile activities against the Axis, at least from the Columbus incident in December 19, 1939 to the occupation of Iceland by some 40,000 American soldiers since July 7, 1941.
In fact, the Pan-American Security Zone severely hindered the critical U-boat campaigns in the Western Atlantic since 1941.
The American lend lease was already overtly providing highly needed support to both the UK and the USSR.
Everybody expected a full participation of the US sooner or later.
Even so, essentially all the German command (Hitler included) agreed that it was better not to accelerate the process.
That changed after Pearl Harbor; the Führer presumably expected his Japanese "allies" to attack the Soviets in exchange; needless to say, he was utterly disappointed.
Closely followed by allowing Spain to stay out of the war, thus exposing the Med to British and Amercian access (North Africa, Italy< Palestine, South of France etc.) He should have forced Spain more actively into the war as an ally or taken Gibraltar by airborne attack.
As already pointed out by Optiow & Someguy, Spain was in terrible conditions after their long and fierce Civil War; even so, it was a "non-belligerent" member of the Axis.
Mainly for economic reasons, the Spanish neutrality was actually helpful for both sides.
Naturally, Hitler tried to get the Spanish support for the projected Operation Felix against Gibraltar; Franco actually considered the offer in his meeting with Hitler at Hendaya and reportedly asked for some colonial compensations. like Morocco, Tanger, Oran, and the increase of the territories of Rio de Oro and the Spanish Guinea; the Vichy France would have to pay for that exchange.
After the succesive meeting Hitler-Pétain at Montoire, the ¨Germans concluded it was better for them to keep the cooperation of the Vichy regime.
It seems Hitler sometime considered invading Spain; being that the case, it's clear he concluded it was not worth the effort at the time.
 
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Oct 2009
6,668
Philadelphia, PA
#90
The number 1 blunder for Hitler was:
Being too successful early on which in turn cause Hitler to become overconfident and make disastrous blunders later on in the war.

The Nazi basically steamrolled EVERYONE early on in the war, I think this lead to a false sense of superiority of the German war machine, which in turn caused him to make decisions thinking victory would be swift and total.

I have seen making good post of Hitlers blunders , Deadkenny had some really good points.

His remarks about Hitler NOT coming as a "liberator of communism" when he invaded the Soviet Union was mroe of a blunder than is realized. Many peoples of the Soviet Union AT FIRST did think of the Nazi as liberators, until they came to realize that the Nazis were far worst that the Soviets.