Honoring CSA Soliders

Should Confederate Soliders Be Honored?

  • Yes

    Votes: 40 64.5%
  • No

    Votes: 13 21.0%
  • Undecided

    Votes: 9 14.5%

  • Total voters
    62
Jan 2015
505
Large Fields
#1
As a commonly known fact, both Union and Confederate troops fought bloodily against each other for their own causes. Now here's the question. Should Confederate soldiers be honored in the American society. Would you you call them traitors, or Americans who fought for their life? What are your opinions?
 
Dec 2011
427
Midwest USA
#2
There have been hosts of brave UNselfish soldiers who have hazarded their lives for causes that were (are) UNworthy of them. That does not change the fact of their sacrifice. So I voted yes.
 

Salah

Forum Staff
Oct 2009
23,284
Maryland
#3
I like to follow the precedent set by Ulysses S. Grant in his Memoirs - loath their cause, but tip your hat in grudging respect to the courage of the men who died striving for it. Perhaps that seems hypocritical, but it also seems like the most reasonable option.

Though its really unbalanced. Lee and Jackson are American demi-gods; Grant and Sherman are only mentioned when Lost Causers and idiots want a Yankee to demonize. Likewise, there's this image that Confederate soldiers were superior to their Federal counterparts, which is obviously untrue (consider, for instance, the chronic desertion problem that the South endured for the duration of the entire War).

Honoring the memory of CS soldiers isn't necessarily inappropriate, but they absolutely shouldn't be elevated above the men who put them down.
 
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Likes: Ichon
Jun 2014
1,221
VA
#4
I like to follow the precedent set by Ulysses S. Grant in his Memoirs - loath their cause, but tip your hat in grudging respect to the courage of the men who died striving for it. Perhaps that seems hypocritical, but it also seems like the most reasonable option.

Though its really unbalanced. Lee and Jackson are American demi-gods; Grant and Sherman are only mentioned when Lost Causers and idiots want a Yankee to demonize. Likewise, there's this image that Confederate soldiers were superior to their Federal counterparts, which is obviously untrue (consider, for instance, the chronic desertion problem that the South endured for the duration of the entire War).

Honoring the memory of CS soldiers isn't necessarily inappropriate, but they absolutely shouldn't be elevated above the men who put them down.
This really is the way to go; the reason most Americans subscribe to it today is Grant was absolutely correct (as was Sherman another person who advocated reconciliation).

It is easy to forget the man southerners loathed most was the biggest softy out of all the Northern generals/officials.
 
Mar 2012
1,571
City of Angels
#9
Only because they lost.

If they'd won and the CSA became an independent state (yes lots of ifs and buts here) they'd be heroic freedom fighters.
I'd be interested in knowing what members from outside the U.S. think about Confederate statues that adorn many campuses and federal buildings around the country.

The Jefferson Davis statue that stands within site of the University of Texas clock tower and main building area is one of several on that campus.




This photo shows one of various bullet holes at the statue's feet that still riddle the entire campus after the 1966 mass shooting from atop the famed clock tower. Needless to say, it can be an ominous setting when the history is put in context. (A cop tried to shoot at the tower through that opening and was subsequently shot at twice and killed.)

 
May 2013
1,696
Colorado
#10
Virginia has struggled with honoring its veterans of the War. Inevitably it turns into a glorification of the lost cause and all types of contemporary issues thrown into the mix. Governors have tried to include remembering the slaves who suffered and those who remained loyal to the Union and inevitably none is happy.

One makes choices in life and has to live and die with the consequences. Thus like the loosing soldiers throughout history, they are in a no man's land. They knew the risk: had they won, they would be heroes, but they lost.

And yes, they were traitors to the Republic.
 
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