How and when did "Roshan" become a popular name among Hindus?

Oct 2012
3,312
Des Moines, Iowa
#1
Most Hindus have names of Sanskritic origin, and on that basis are easily distinguishable from South Asian Muslims, who usually have Arabic or Persian names instead of Sanskritic names. However, the name "Roshan" seems to be a notable exception to this phenomenon. The name "Roshan" is of Persian origin, and means "light" (the Arabic equivalent is Noor, though Noor is often a female name whereas Roshan is almost exclusively a male name). Does anyone know when, and how, the name "Roshan" gained popularity among Hindus? Who is the first notable Hindu figure to have this name?
 
Likes: Futurist

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,489
New Delhi, India
#2
Sanskrit too is an import. When the Muslim influence came, some wordw not intimately connected with Islam were adopted in names. The same happened when the European influence came. We have names like Tina, Nancy, Rita, etc. Iqbal is another name with Muslim origin. Roshan Lal, Roshan Singh, Iqbal Narayan, Iqbal Singh.
 
Likes: Futurist

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,524
USA
#3
Most Hindus have names of Sanskritic origin, and on that basis are easily distinguishable from South Asian Muslims, who usually have Arabic or Persian names instead of Sanskritic names. However, the name "Roshan" seems to be a notable exception to this phenomenon. The name "Roshan" is of Persian origin, and means "light" (the Arabic equivalent is Noor, though Noor is often a female name whereas Roshan is almost exclusively a male name). Does anyone know when, and how, the name "Roshan" gained popularity among Hindus? Who is the first notable Hindu figure to have this name?
Just so you know, "roch" is a Vedic word and it means light or shining. So roshan is a derivative of roch. In the ultimate analysis, the Persian word is derived from the Vedic word.
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,524
USA
#4
Sanskrit too is an import. When the Muslim influence came, some wordw not intimately connected with Islam were adopted in names. The same happened when the European influence came. We have names like Tina, Nancy, Rita, etc. Iqbal is another name with Muslim origin. Roshan Lal, Roshan Singh, Iqbal Narayan, Iqbal Singh.
Answer the question instead of spreading nonsense that Sanskrit is an import.
 

Aatreya

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
3,524
USA
#5
Just so you know, "roch" is a Vedic word and it means light or shining. So roshan is a derivative of roch. In the ultimate analysis, the Persian word is derived from the Vedic word.
The equivalent usage in Sanskrit would be rochana or lochana, example being RAjIvalOchana. However I agree that the word Roshan itself is the Persian version of Rochana.
 
Jun 2012
7,282
Malaysia
#8
Sanskrit too is an import. When the Muslim influence came, some wordw not intimately connected with Islam were adopted in names. The same happened when the European influence came. We have names like Tina, Nancy, Rita, etc. Iqbal is another name with Muslim origin. Roshan Lal, Roshan Singh, Iqbal Narayan, Iqbal Singh.
Rita could also be a shortened form of Amrita (and Tina of Sutina or Ratina?) (and Nancy an anglicised form of Nanashi?).
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,489
New Delhi, India
#9
True. As I said, both languages are derived from pre-Vedic.
caran vatso ruśanniha nidātāraṃ na vindate l veti stotavāmbyam ll
(For sovereigns of dear wealth are ye, Ādityas, not of sinner's wealth; you sapient Gods who slay the foe.)
Rita could also be a shortened form of Amrita (and Tina of Sutina or Ratina?) (and Nancy an anglicised form of Nanashi?).
Dreamhunter, seems you are riding the horses of imagination. :)
 
Jun 2012
7,282
Malaysia
#10
Well, at least with Amrita I have a higher likelihood of having ridden right.

If there is a young Indian lady named Amrita (as in Amrita Singh, first wife of Saif Ali Khan?), her friends would certainly be calling her Rita for shorts.
 

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