How come the Soviet Union/Greater Russia didn't have any giant metropolitan areas on the Black and/or Caspian Seas?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
How come the Soviet Union/Greater Russia didn't have any giant metropolitan areas on the Black and/or Caspian Seas? Here in the US, we have a giant metropolitan area (New York City) on the Atlantic Ocean as well as another one further south (Miami) on the same ocean and also have a giant metropolitan area (Chicago) on the Great Lakes as well as another giant one (Houston) near the Gulf of Mexico and two additional giant ones (Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area) on the Pacific Ocean. In contrast, the Soviet Union/Greater Russia didn't really have any giant metropolitan areas on the Black and Caspian Seas? The closest thing to this that they had on the Caspian Sea was Baku and even then Baku's metropolitan area pales in comparison to New York, Chicago, Houston, or Los Angeles and they didn't have any large metropolitan areas on the Black Sea at all. In Tsarist times, Odessa was relatively large for the time, but it was only 17th in population among all Soviet cities in 1989. Even so, Odessa and Roston-on-Don--both with populations slightly over one million both in 1989 and today--were the largest cities in the Soviet Union/Greater Russia that were located either on or near the Black Sea.

Anyway, why doesn't the Soviet Union/Greater Russia have any giant metropolitan areas on the Black and/or Caspian Seas? Any thoughts on this? I mean, it's got giant Moscow in the center of European Russia and it's got large St. Petersburg on the Baltic Sea, but nothing at all comparable to this on the Black Sea.
 
Apr 2017
1,654
U.S.A.
Russia only really has two giant metropolitan regions, both were capitals at some point. St. Petersburg was chosen because the Baltic was Russia's window to the west (as they could more quickly sail to the west from there). If Peter the Great had instead built his capital at Azov (which is connected to Rostov via the Don river) they would be blocked by the Ottoman Turks. So instead he focused on the Baltic, which gave them good access to western Europe. So you could say they don't have one because they don't need one. Although Rostov is sort of one.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Russia only really has two giant metropolitan regions, both were capitals at some point. St. Petersburg was chosen because the Baltic was Russia's window to the west (as they could more quickly sail to the west from there). If Peter the Great had instead built his capital at Azov (which is connected to Rostov via the Don river) they would be blocked by the Ottoman Turks. So instead he focused on the Baltic, which gave them good access to western Europe. So you could say they don't have one because they don't need one. Although Rostov is sort of one.
Makes one wonder if there would have been more of a need for a Russian Black Sea capital had the Russians managed to conquer Constantinople. Of course, in such a scenario, Constantinople itself would be this capital, no?
 
Apr 2017
1,654
U.S.A.
Makes one wonder if there would have been more of a need for a Russian Black Sea capital had the Russians managed to conquer Constantinople. Of course, in such a scenario, Constantinople itself would be this capital, no?
Perhaps but that would be far removed from Russia proper.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Yes, but it would leave a disconnect with the Russian people. They would view it as their ruler being from a far and distant region. Additionally it would be difficult to maintain supply lines unless they take over all of turkey
Yeah, that makes sense. For what it's worth, I was thinking of having Russia conquer the entire northern Anatolian coastline, but even then, Constantinople's land connection to the rest of Russia would have been narrow and tenuous.
 

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,708
Russia came into secure possession of the Black Sea regions relatively late and the bulk of the population was long concentrated along the central rivers and lakes. There are some decent places right on the Black Sea coast and there are 3-4 large cities there which I would be surprised not to see those southern cities growing relatively faster than the rest of Russia aside from the main economic centres over the next 50 years.
 
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