How deep did WW2 submarines typically travel?

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
2,998
Dispargum
#21
Curiously, the German Navy experienced similar problems with ... magnetic pistols ... on their G7 torpedoes.
The British also had problems with magnetic pistols in their torpedoes as would anyone else who tried to develop a magnetic influence torpedo in the 1930s. The problem was that no one had studied the Earth's magnetic field sufficiently to realize that magnetic field was not constant. Torpedoes were developed and tested in the local conditions near the torpedo research facilities, but just a few hundred miles away the Earth's magnetic field was sufficiently different that the torpedoes could not tell the difference between background magnetism and a ship's magnetic field. Surprisingly, however, I don't think magnetic mines had this problem.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
6,574
#22
The British also had problems with magnetic pistols in their torpedoes as would anyone else who tried to develop a magnetic influence torpedo in the 1930s. The problem was that no one had studied the Earth's magnetic field sufficiently to realize that magnetic field was not constant. Torpedoes were developed and tested in the local conditions near the torpedo research facilities, but just a few hundred miles away the Earth's magnetic field was sufficiently different that the torpedoes could not tell the difference between background magnetism and a ship's magnetic field. Surprisingly, however, I don't think magnetic mines had this problem.
A torpedo is travelling a lot faster than a mine, and you have a narrower window for the torpedo o explode. You don't want to trigger the torpedo to exode too soon, but it obviously can't wait to long either before it explodes. Because I he speed difference between a mine and a ship.was a lot less, the mines didn't have to be as sensitive and you had stringent timing issues as with a torpedo. Keep in mind a torpedo is travelling at something like 40 knots, while ships typically traveled at less than 20 knots, 30 knots tops. The mine had a large window in which to explode.
 
Likes: Chlodio

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,725
Sydney
#23
Degaussing a ship was used to inverse the remain magnetism in warships ,
it was possible to make the ship "South magnetic" which totally confused the magnetic detonators
the German tried sound locators but the Royal navy took only a few weeks to counteract this by using trailing buckets rattling loose pieces
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
2,998
Dispargum
#24
When I brought up magnetic mines not having the same problems torpedoes had, I was referring to premature detonations, ie, mines exploding when there was no ship present due to natural variations in the Earth's magnetic field. Bart's got a good explanation there. I don't know if there's another explanation out there or not.
 

Similar History Discussions