How did people achieve the bodies portrayed in Greek Statues without modern knowledge of health and fitness?

Linschoten

Ad Honoris
Aug 2010
16,027
Welsh Marches
#2
Many of them would of course have looked nothing like Greek statues! People knew the effects of taking exercise and traiing in the gymnasia from experience, they didn't need 'sports science' for that.
 
Jun 2018
114
New York
#5
They had to have gotten the ideal human body from somewhere. And I like to believe these people weren't clueless on how to achieve a healthy, strong body. They may not have had our modern knowledge on health and fitness, but they for sure had their own knowledge on the subject. As well as diet and exercise regimens.
 
Aug 2016
912
US&A
#6
Hunter-Gatherers often have very good physiques. It just comes from not eating too much, and having an active lifestyle.

body.jpg
I am not sure what an early-agriculturalist (ancient greek) physique looked like, and I'm sure the statues are idealized portrayals, but even so, it may not have been as far off the mark as some may think.
 
Apr 2018
951
Upland, Sweden
#9
Hunter-Gatherers often have very good physiques. It just comes from not eating too much, and having an active lifestyle.

View attachment 20285
I am not sure what an early-agriculturalist (ancient greek) physique looked like, and I'm sure the statues are idealized portrayals, but even so, it may not have been as far off the mark as some may think.
Not so sure the statues are all idealized portraits. The ancients liked to use plaster casts from what I've understood - one of my professors told me that they found an actual cast-mold in Southern Italy only a few years ago. Sure, maybe the abs were put there afterwards but anyway...

I think those guys look a bit thin - although perhaps not unhelathily so.
 
Likes: fascinating

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,517
#10
Healthy diets and a lot of physical labor will produce fit physiques.

The lack of fitness among many modern people in first world nations is due to lifestyles that have become sedentary and unhealthy diets. Obesity existed in ancient times too of course, but that was largely limited to the rich. The average Greek or Roman was a yeoman farmer who performed a lot of physical labor during the day, and their diets would not be entirely dissimilar from modern Mediterranean diets which are known to have a number of health benefits.
 
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