How did things go when a city under siege asked for relief?

Aug 2019
12
Canada
Hi all.

I have been doing a modest family research over the past while. I’ve loosely pieced together some things. If anyone has info and could help me out, it would be great.

My dads side left the area of Friuli which is northern Italy nowadays about 500 years to help a Croatian city called Klis that was under siege by the ottomans.

My questions are how and who organized these events, the logistics must have been terrible.

Any input?
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,768
Dispargum
There must have been some kind of relationship between Klis and Friuli. Most likely they were either ruled by the same government, or they were allies. Whoever commanded the military in Friuli would assemble an army and march off toward Klis. 500 years ago they probably lived off the land. They may have brought some supplies in wagons or if the route of march was along the coast, they could have used ships to transport supplies. However they did it, armies were well versed in the acquisition and distribution of supplies. There probably was a high ranking officer in the army called the quartermaster who was responsible for feeding the troops. He also controlled the transportation, either wagons or ships. If living off of the land he would be in charge of sending out foraging parties to seize food and other supplies from the surrounding countryside. Yes, it was a big job entrusted only to a man with experience at this sort of thing. The quartermaster would be assisted by a large staff of lower ranking officers. These officers were gaining the experience that would qualify them to be quartermasters in the future. That's how armies work - everyone starts at the bottom, and as you gain experience and demonstrate talent, you work your way up through the ranks.
 
Aug 2019
12
Canada
Thanks. I can that happening the way you explained.

Would these guys coming be conscripted or? Would they be expected to settle?
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,768
Dispargum
500 years ago the soldiers were probably all volunteers. Mass conscription was still in the future and feudal obligations were all in the past. If desperate for recruits, a king or other leader could order press gangs or something similar to force random men into the ranks, but that was rare. Enlistment inducements could get creative. During the Hundred Years War one English king offered a pardon to any criminal in prison who enlisted in the army instead. Promises of plunder could be another incentive to enlist. Between living off the land and plundering to pay the soldiers, Klis could honestly ask themselves 'Who is worse? The Ottomans or the Friulis?
 

macon

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
4,198
Slovenia, EU
Hi all.

I have been doing a modest family research over the past while. I’ve loosely pieced together some things. If anyone has info and could help me out, it would be great.

My dads side left the area of Friuli which is northern Italy nowadays about 500 years to help a Croatian city called Klis that was under siege by the ottomans.

My questions are how and who organized these events, the logistics must have been terrible.

Any input?
Local aristocracy were organizing military efforts. A duke of a particular duchy demanded from aristocracy (with their military) and town militias to come to a meeting point if a danger was close by, otherwise land's assemblies were discussing matters and appointing people and resources for a particular military effort.

Logistics were troublesome because there was no centralized system of training, provisioning and equipping, maintaining of crucial infrastructure as roads, bridges, forts. Rulers in second half of 17th, 18th century improved all that in Europe with their administrative reforms.
 
Aug 2019
12
Canada
Hi everyone!

After the migration my dads side joined a sort of pirate republic. These folks were called Uskoks. From what Ive heard they made money raiding their enemies until they were disbanded and fled to other parts. My dads side ended up settling in a area called “Lika”.

Maybe the lure of plunder vs a life of toil as peasant kept them there and not from returning to Friuli?
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,768
Dispargum
Re-integrating soldiers back into civilian society has always been problematic. When you give a man a weapon and tell him to use force and violence to take what he needs in order to live, it can be difficult to get him to stop and return to an honest life of hard work. Your ancestor is hardly unique in that regard.
 

macon

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
4,198
Slovenia, EU
Hi everyone!

After the migration my dads side joined a sort of pirate republic. These folks were called Uskoks. From what Ive heard they made money raiding their enemies until they were disbanded and fled to other parts. My dads side ended up settling in a area called “Lika”.

Maybe the lure of plunder vs a life of toil as peasant kept them there and not from returning to Friuli?
They were border guards- light cavalry bordering Ottomans and not paying taxes, only taking weapons and horses on shortest notice. Similar to cossacks.
 
Aug 2019
12
Canada
Hi guys.

Thanks for all the input, you guys have filled a lot of gaps. Unfortunately I will never know anything close to all the details, but getting a understanding that you provided is still bringing me closer to those that came before me.

Thank you all.