How do North Africans nowadays view Carthage?

Futurist

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May 2014
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How do North Africans nowadays view Carthage and its empire?

One would think that this is something for North Africans to be proud of--specifically that they were able to create an empire that was able to rival the Roman Empire for a certain period of time. However, the Carthaginian Empire was not Muslim like North Africa is nowadays--and I'm wondering if that plays a role in determining current North African views towards Carthage and its empire.

Any thoughts on this?
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,860
Western Eurasia
I don't know much about it, i think they only matter in Tunis. How the average Tunisian view them i don't really know, the few Tunisians i've conversed (practicing muslims) about it they said they were proud of it as a cultural heritage of the land and they appreciate the Carthagians in that context, but thats all. They didn't go into silly extremes like claiming to be they themselves are Puns etc (similarly how some Maronite far rightists try to do in Lebanon with the Phoenicians), just proud of the historical legacy that remained there.

Apparently the country also officially embrace the Carthagian heritage, at least based on the money (I don't know what is thaught in Tunisian schools about it)

Tunisian 5 dinar note with Hannibal Barca on the front, Carthagian ships on the back






10 dinar note with Elissa/Dido, the legendary founder of Carthage on the front side (on the back side i think it is a Roman temple ruin in Duqqa)



 

Futurist

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May 2014
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Very interesting!

BTW, who are the Puns?

Also, the reason that I was asking about North Africa in general here is because it looks like in addition to Tunisia, the Carthaganians also controlled parts of Libya, Algeria, and Morocco:

 

Tulius

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May 2016
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BTW, who are the Puns?
It is a pun, for Punics: Punics - Wikipedia

Also, the reason that I was asking about North Africa in general here is because it looks like in addition to Tunisia, the Carthaganians also controlled parts of Libya, Algeria, and Morocco:
Sometimes I think we should be careful with those maps, since the dominium of the Carthaginians over those territories is badly documented, and the dominium over the other Phoenician colonies was often nominal, and some even weren’t very fond of it, like Gades or Utica.
 

Futurist

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May 2014
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Tulius

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May 2016
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What do you personally think is the most reliable map for this?
In that map Carthage seems a bit extended, and we don’t have a date, a fundamental thing on a historical map. It seems to flop several time periods. But maps are representations that can often induce in error, making us believe that the things were bigger than they really were. They are approaches to the reality, to give us an overall idea.

Anyway, just took a look to the Wikipedia entry about Carthage (Ancient Carthage - Wikipedia) and the two maps there seem slightly better.

At least this one: Ancient Carthage - Wikipedia

Still recalling that in the painted areas the control would often be “vassal”.

Anyway, I have strong doubts about the Carthaginian control in the Iberian Peninsula. Until were it went. The sources are scarce and don’t talk much to us. So the questions are more than the answers. For instance in the Portuguese coast there were Phoenician colonies, at least trade colonies. They never appear represented in those maps. Were they part of the Carthaginian empire? Probably.
 

Tulun

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Nov 2010
3,860
Western Eurasia
It is a pun, for Punics: Punics - Wikipedia
Thanks for the correction, no pun was intended, I just didn't know how they are called in English :)

Anyway as I understand this is a first year history school book in Tunis for secondary schools,

http://www.cnp.com.tn/cnp.tn/arabic/PDF/207103P00.pdf

It is in Arabic so I understand very little from it, but there are also images and maps in it so it can give an idea to everybody. As I go through it it only deals with national history, the first 84 pages (out of the total 224 pages) deal with Carthage, both independent and then under Roman rule, the rest of the book continues with the history of Tunis with the appearance of Arabs up to the modern times. So apparently it occupies a prominent part of Tunisian history education.

There are other Tunisian history school books too for later years or for specialized high schools on the site of the Tunisian ministry of education: تحميل الكتب و الوثائق البيداغوجية التربوية just on the row المادة (subject) choose تاريخ (history) and then push the red ابحث (search) button. French version of the site: téléchargement
 
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