How do you get a lot of Russians to settle in the southern parts of the Russian Empire?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,197
SoCal
According to wikipedia data there were 44.000(16%) of Russians in Riga in 1897 and 100.000(21%) in 1913. Riga (and in less degree some other towns) was industrial growing spot. And there was influx of Russian migrants to its facilities before 1917 too.
Interestingly enough, Riga was by far the largest Russian Baltic city both in 1897 and in 1989.
 
Jan 2014
1,093
Rus
Could Russia have realistically conquered Manchuria before large numbers of Chinese would have begun settling there, though?
It is question about combination of several processes: weakening of China's army, bulding logistics in Siberia by Russia, weakening of China's law which disallow Chinaese settling in Manchuria, advancing of Chinese migration wave, advancing of Russian migration wave, diplomatic situation in the world (other powers dont like russian expansion).

I dont familiar with all of them to be able to give answer. But situation was close. As i know, when Russian build TransManchurian railway then Chinese were sparse along main route (in northern Manchuria). And railway helped very much to their infiltration.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,197
SoCal
It is question about combination of several processes: weakening of China's army, bulding logistics in Siberia by Russia, weakening of China's law which disallow Chinaese settling in Manchuria, advancing of Chinese migration wave, advancing of Russian migration wave, diplomatic situation in the world (other powers dont like russian expansion).

I dont familiar with all of them to be able to give answer. But situation was close. As i know, when Russian build TransManchurian railway then Chinese were sparse along main route (in northern Manchuria). And railway helped very much to their infiltration.
Interesting. As late as the 1890s, northern Manchuria might have had few enough Chinese for Russia to still be able to annex it.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,197
SoCal
Certainly allowed.

I read about cases when management of various companies/organizations was forced to accept/raise minority peoples. So thereafter other peoples were excluded/lowered. Even my familiars in USA told about such cases in their job. So i think this is widespread.
That's not political office, though.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,197
SoCal
Were they supported by a great power in 1991?
Yeah, if the USSR/Russia actually wanted to engage in economic reforms, it would presumably need a lot of Western aid and investment. That's probably going to be much harder to obtain if it insists on keeping all of its territory by force.

If the Baltic states break away from Russia in the early 20th century in a scenario without Communism, are the other Great Powers actually willing to suspend their trade and economic relations with Russia in exchange for a Russian recognition of Baltic independence?