How do you get a lot of Russians to settle in the southern parts of the Russian Empire?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,992
SoCal
Which parts? The far east was also settled during Stolypin reform.
The Kuban, but also the Caucasus and Ottoman Armenia plus Trebizond if Russia would have ever acquired these territories. Also, Central Asia and Xinjiang plus Mongolia if Russia would have ever acquired these territories.
 
Jan 2008
50
A lot of people settled northern Kazakhstan, southern Siberia (hot in summers forest catching fires regularly) Stolypin land reform. The government enticed people with free agricultural land.

Stolypin land reform, (1906–17), measures undertaken by the Russian government to allow peasants to own land individually. Its aim was to encourage industrious peasants to acquire their own land, and ultimately to create a class of prosperous, conservative, small farmers that would be a stabilizing influence in the countryside and would support the autocracy. After the government emancipated the serfs in 1861 it allotted land to each peasant household, but the land was collectively owned by the village communes. The communes traditionally divided the land into strips, which were distributed among the households for cultivation.
Stolypin land reform | Russian agricultural history

The Russian and Ukrainian settlers actually became a slight majority of the population in Kazakhstan by the mid-1950s. The land was fertile, and there was quite a bit of available space on the steppes. But after Kazakhstan's independence in the early 1990s, many of them emigrated back to Russia, and they now constitute only about 23% of Kazakhstan's population. I don't think that a Russian colonization of the Transcaucasus region would have been as successful, because the land was already more densely inhabited by the native peoples.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,992
SoCal
The Russian and Ukrainian settlers actually became a slight majority of the population in Kazakhstan by the mid-1950s. The land was fertile, and there was quite a bit of available space on the steppes. But after Kazakhstan's independence in the early 1990s, many of them emigrated back to Russia, and they now constitute only about 23% of Kazakhstan's population. I don't think that a Russian colonization of the Transcaucasus region would have been as successful, because the land was already more densely inhabited by the native peoples.
How many more Russians do you think would have settled in Central Asia if it wasn't for the World Wars and Communism?

Also, the coastline in the Caucasus as well as in Ottoman Armenia plus Trebizond (Russia could have probably acquired these territories during the Hamidian massacres in the mid-1890s had it wanted to) could sure use a lot more settlement even nowadays:

Mapping Population Density Across the Globe
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,992
SoCal
There is a possibility we will see this happening in a not far future: the commercial relations between China and Russia are increasing more and more and well cold areas of Siberia are knowing a process of internal migration [btw, the climate of South Russia is in large part well cold ... it's central Asia, North of Tibet and Gobi ... then the area of the Altai, then the region of Novosibirsk ... Caspian and Black Sea offer something better, but winters are anyway not so comfortable].

Anyway at Moscow they are talking of the "Far East" and of a "Siberian Migration". But now there is an alive Chinese migration to that region ...
AFAIK, the number of Chinese in the Russian Far East is still relatively small right now. Life in the Russian Far East probably isn't better than life in China itself.

Ukraine was a no man's land peopled by Russians who developed their own characteristics
the cossacks settlements in the Kuban , Ural , seven rivers , Ussuri and even Kamchatka were historically the seeds of settlement
they had a role as pioneers upholding the empire control
when successful , as the urban population grew the Cossack nature of the society came under pressure
the old Sietch had trouble with the local citizen who saw Cossack as privileged few
What caused the urban population in these territories to grow?
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,064
Italy, Lago Maggiore
AFAIK, the number of Chinese in the Russian Far East is still relatively small right now. Life in the Russian Far East probably isn't better than life in China itself.


What caused the urban population in these territories to grow?
I'm not aware if this is so known around, but there are sectors of the border between China and Russia where actually there is no border ... you can pass. And reality is that the new "Silky Was" pass through those Russian lands with Russians really happy to see incredibly long Chinese trains passing ...

Jews and Italians [I cannot say if historically Jews can beat Italians about commercial activities!] are active there [Jews enjoy the advantage to have a Jewish "Oblast" in the region, but we can do better!]. This is why I know quite well what's going on.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,030
Sydney
urbanization occurred during the 19th century , in concert with a very peaceful period and the growth of the potato
the Empire population seriously increased ,
Ukraine in particular had very few towns , it was raider country ravaged by the Tatar slavers or the Poles on the warpath
once peace was established , market towns created the nucleus for the countryside resettlement

the poor Cossack formed bands of Gaidamaks and raided Polish Ukraine
thus sticking to their old tradition of raiders
much to the anger of the Cossack ,Polish and Russian authorities who wanted stability
ultimately the land mutated as a farming community with great estates sprinkled with growing towns
where non Cossack had no rights
Cossack society itself had been mutating with rich land owning Cossack
and the poor ones having not enough money to equip themselves for service duty
undermining the previous unity of the community
the landowners accepted runaway serfs from Russia and using them as cheap labor
while Jews acting as estate managers or holder of the government vodka monopoly added a level of tension
the abolition of servage was the source of further trouble ,

this was of course a slow process but it accelerated during the 19th century ,Kharkov in particular rose to prominence
absorbing population from all over the empire
 
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Oct 2012
797
I'm not aware if this is so known around, but there are sectors of the border between China and Russia where actually there is no border ... you can pass. And reality is that the new "Silky Was" pass through those Russian lands with Russians really happy to see incredibly long Chinese trains passing ...

Jews and Italians [I cannot say if historically Jews can beat Italians about commercial activities!] are active there [Jews enjoy the advantage to have a Jewish "Oblast" in the region, but we can do better!]. This is why I know quite well what's going on.
I doubt that the "Jewish oblast" gives any advantage to anybody. But can you tell some more about the Jewish and Italian acrivity there?
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,992
SoCal
I doubt that the "Jewish oblast" gives any advantage to anybody. But can you tell some more about the Jewish and Italian acrivity there?
Yeah, I was surprised by this statement as well. Is the Chinese market nearby really so lucrative as for Jewish and Italian businessmen to operate in the Russian Far East?