How do you get a strong independence movement to develop in Puerto Rico, the USVI, and American Samoa?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#1
How do you get a strong independence movement to develop in Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, and American Samoa?

By "strong," I mean an independence movement that commands support among 40+% of the population of these territories.
 

M9Powell

Ad Honorem
Oct 2014
4,384
appalacian Mtns
#2
I have no idea. My impression of Puerto Rico when I was there, they overwhelming loved the USA. How has life improved in the Philippines or Panama since they gained independence? There are a lot of benefits to being part of the USA. I think we should make Puerto Rico the 51st state & Ireland the 52nd. That's assuming the people there want it? And to be specific I mean the entire island of Ireland.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#4
There never will be one, because Puerto Rico is vastly better off under American rule than they would be by themselves.
So, you'd need the US to disenfranchise Puerto Ricans just like France did with Algerians? I mean, Algerians would have been better off remaining a part of France, but they didn't like being excluded from the French national community.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#5
I have no idea. My impression of Puerto Rico when I was there, they overwhelming loved the USA. How has life improved in the Philippines or Panama since they gained independence? There are a lot of benefits to being part of the USA. I think we should make Puerto Rico the 51st state & Ireland the 52nd. That's assuming the people there want it? And to be specific I mean the entire island of Ireland.
Ireland has actually been doing very well lately (at least up to the Great Recession).

As for an improved quality of life, when countries have low human capital, then there is only so much that they could improve. Obviously all countries should be helped in reaching their full potential, but it's far from clear that all countries have the same potential.

I do think that both the Philippines and Panama would have been better off being a part of the US--though giving all Filipinos US citizenship would have significantly altered the demographic balance of the US.
 
Mar 2016
900
Australia
#6
So, you'd need the US to disenfranchise Puerto Ricans just like France did with Algerians? I mean, Algerians would have been better off remaining a part of France, but they didn't like being excluded from the French national community.
Yeah probably, but Puerto Rico is so small and inconsequential to the US as a whole that I can see no reason why the US government would do something like that.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#7
Yeah probably, but Puerto Rico is so small and inconsequential to the US as a whole that I can see no reason why the US government would do something like that.
Well, Algeria was likewise small and inconsequential from a demographic perspective back in the early 19th century (with Algeria having two million people to France's over thirty million people). Of course, Algerians are Muslims while Puerto Ricans are Christians.

Did France treat its overseas Christian territories better than it treated its overseas Muslim territories?
 

M9Powell

Ad Honorem
Oct 2014
4,384
appalacian Mtns
#8
Ireland has actually been doing very well lately (at least up to the Great Recession).

.
Who says an area has 2 be economically depressed to become a US state? I say that only because there are so many people of Irish decent in the USA. They wouldn't have too sorry about the English anymore either. Those of us with Irish blood are quite fond of Ireland.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#9
Who says an area has 2 be economically depressed to become a US state? I say that only because there are so many people of Irish decent in the USA. They wouldn't have too sorry about the English anymore either. Those of us with Irish blood are quite fond of Ireland.
Fair enough, I suppose.

Also, out of curiosity--does anyone here know why New Caledonia has such a strong independence movement? After all, AFAIK, they have French citizenship and French voting rights (without gerrymandering) and I'm presuming that they would be better off as a part of France as opposed to being independent. Is nationalism there simply that strong? Or is there another reason for this?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,748
SoCal
#10
There never will be one, because Puerto Rico is vastly better off under American rule than they would be by themselves.
Somewhat off-topic question for you and others: Do you think that Puerto Rico and/or the Danish West Indies would have ever become independent in a scenario where the US would have never acquired them? Or would they have remained a part of Spain/Denmark up to the present-day in such a scenario?
 

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