How do you get a strong independence movement to develop in Puerto Rico, the USVI, and American Samoa?

Apr 2017
974
U.S.A.
#11
Also, out of curiosity--does anyone here know why New Caledonia has such a strong independence movement? After all, AFAIK, they have French citizenship and French voting rights (without gerrymandering) and I'm presuming that they would be better off as a part of France as opposed to being independent. Is nationalism there simply that strong? Or is there another reason for this?
Somewhat off-topic question for you and others: Do you think that Puerto Rico and/or the Danish West Indies would have ever become independent in a scenario where the US would have never acquired them? Or would they have remained a part of Spain/Denmark up to the present-day in such a scenario?
New Caledonia is in the pacific surrounded by small independent states, they see their neighbors and want what they have.
Puerto Rico, yes. Danish west indies, hard to say. Britain, France and the Netherlands still own territories in the Caribbean, so Denmark might of too.
 
Likes: Futurist
Mar 2019
278
Kansas
#12
Fair enough, I suppose.

Also, out of curiosity--does anyone here know why New Caledonia has such a strong independence movement? After all, AFAIK, they have French citizenship and French voting rights (without gerrymandering) and I'm presuming that they would be better off as a part of France as opposed to being independent. Is nationalism there simply that strong? Or is there another reason for this?
It is driven almost exclusively by Kanaks (The original inhabitants) It also has a strong economy driven by tourism, and one of the few places still under colonial rule that could quality as a viable independent nation. The 2018 referendum ran almost 100% along ethnic lines
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,559
SoCal
#14
i think puerto rico should just become a us state, if hawaii can why not puerto rico?
I agree with this, but then again I might be biased because Puerto Ricans will probably vote Democratic. :)

It is driven almost exclusively by Kanaks (The original inhabitants) It also has a strong economy driven by tourism, and one of the few places still under colonial rule that could quality as a viable independent nation. The 2018 referendum ran almost 100% along ethnic lines
Would New Caledonia's economy have been as strong if it wasn't a part of France, though? To what extent does the French government subsidize New Caledonia?
 
Mar 2019
278
Kansas
#15
I agree with this, but then again I might be biased because Puerto Ricans will probably vote Democratic. :)


Would New Caledonia's economy have been as strong if it wasn't a part of France, though? To what extent does the French government subsidize New Caledonia?
It does not get subsidies. It has one of the largest economies in the region and the GDP per capita is higher than both Australia and New Zealand.
 
Likes: Futurist
Mar 2019
278
Kansas
#19
France did allow an independence referendum in NC, though.
Thats really been as a result of UN pressure, in the last 20 years or so. Prior to that there was a pretty sustained period of instability caused by the growing independence movement. But I was really been tongue in cheek with my tax comment. Once the French agreed to move towards decolonizing New Caledonia, they have have genuinely kept up there side of the bargain.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,559
SoCal
#20
*their, not there.

Also, AFAIK, two additional independence referendums are scheduled to be held in New Caledonia within the next several years.