How do you get an expansionist India after independence?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
14,371
SoCal
#1
How exactly do you make India be expansionist after independence?

For the record, I don't mean territories such as Hyderabad or Kashmir or Junagadh or Goa. Rather, I mean have India expand beyond these territories to territories that it never either controlled or claimed in real life. Also, this expansion needs to happen after India's independence; thus, an independent united India which includes both Pakistan and Bangladesh won't cut it because India would have acquired these territories at the point of independence.

Anyway, any thoughts on how to accomplish this?
 
Jun 2018
136
New Hampshire
#2
Here's an idea, a particularly militarist Maharaja ascends to power who seeks to restore India's past Mughul glories. He raises a vast army and sends his soldiers into neighboring Nepal, Bhutan, and Burma. Perhaps he takes advantage of the political chaos caused by China's civil war and annexes Tibet as well.

I could see an interesting scenario here. With all of your ideas Futurist, you should seriously consider writing historical fiction. I would sure read a novel you wrote.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
14,371
SoCal
#3
Here's an idea, a particularly militarist Maharaja ascends to power who seeks to restore India's past Mughul glories. He raises a vast army and sends his soldiers into neighboring Nepal, Bhutan, and Burma. Perhaps he takes advantage of the political chaos caused by China's civil war and annexes Tibet as well.
Building on the Mughal history would be kind of problematic since the Mughals were Muslims--not Hindus.

I could see an interesting scenario here. With all of your ideas Futurist, you should seriously consider writing historical fiction. I would sure read a novel you wrote.
Unfortunately, I am not that creative. I am very good with coming up with all sorts of different AH scenarios but much less good with filling in the details.
 
Jun 2018
136
New Hampshire
#4
Building on the Mughal history would be kind of problematic since the Mughals were Muslims--not Hindus.



Unfortunately, I am not that creative. I am very good with coming up with all sorts of different AH scenarios but much less good with filling in the details.
Yes, the fact that the Mughals were Muslims certainly would prove problematic. Do you know of any powerful Hindu expansionist kingdoms? I am not too familiar with Indian history.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
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SoCal
#5
Yes, the fact that the Mughals were Muslims certainly would prove problematic. Do you know of any powerful Hindu expansionist kingdoms? I am not too familiar with Indian history.
There was the Maratha Empire--though the British expansion in India put a halt to their expansion.
 
Jun 2018
136
New Hampshire
#6
There was the Maratha Empire--though the British expansion in India put a halt to their expansion.
Okay, that is a possibility. The year is 1947, India received independence from Great Britain and is not partitioned. In the immediate aftermath of India's independence, a powerful and ambitious Maharaja with a deep militarist streak ascends to power riding on a wave of nationalist fervor promising to revive the past glories of the Hindu Maratha Empire. This ruler invests all of newly independent India's economic resources and vast manpower into the military and raises a massive army some 20 million men strong.

The Maharaja sends his army to invade and annex first Nepal, then Bhutan both of which fall without much resistance. The Indian army then invades Burma, where it initially meets heavy resistance. But the valiant efforts of the Burmese are not enough to withstand the vast Indian army that numbers in the millions and Burma soon falls to the onslaught. After taking some time to consolidate his gains, the Indian ruler takes advantage of the chaos in China caused by that country's civil war. He sends his army into Tibet, which is then annexed without much resistance.

The Indian army then begins to make forays into China proper, and with great success seizes control of the Xinjiang. Realizing their mutual danger, the rival nationalist and communist armies of Chiang Kai Shek and Mao Zedong temporarily put aside their differences and combine forces (in a similar manner to the Second World War against Japan), and send their armies against the invading Indian troops. The fighting is bitter, with great losses on both sides. But as a politically shrewd man, the Maharaja forms alliances with certain factions in China, which results in further division within the country. Realizing it is a lost cause, the Chinese nationalists and communists sign a peace treaty with India, the terms of which include Indian suzerainty over Tibet, Xinjiang, Xikang, Qinghai, and Gansu.

India is now in possession of a vast empire, and the largest manpower reserve on earth. It then takes time to consolidate its gains before attempting to annex further territory.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
14,371
SoCal
#7
Okay, that is a possibility. The year is 1947, India received independence from Great Britain and is not partitioned. In the immediate aftermath of India's independence, a powerful and ambitious Maharaja with a deep militarist streak ascends to power riding on a wave of nationalist fervor promising to revive the past glories of the Hindu Maratha Empire. This ruler invests all of newly independent India's economic resources and vast manpower into the military and raises a massive army some 20 million men strong.

The Maharaja sends his army to invade and annex first Nepal, then Bhutan both of which fall without much resistance. The Indian army then invades Burma, where it initially meets heavy resistance. But the valiant efforts of the Burmese are not enough to withstand the vast Indian army that numbers in the millions and Burma soon falls to the onslaught. After taking some time to consolidate his gains, the Indian ruler takes advantage of the chaos in China caused by that country's civil war. He sends his army into Tibet, which is then annexed without much resistance.

The Indian army then begins to make forays into China proper, and with great success seizes control of the Xinjiang. Realizing their mutual danger, the rival nationalist and communist armies of Chiang Kai Shek and Mao Zedong temporarily put aside their differences and combine forces (in a similar manner to the Second World War against Japan), and send their armies against the invading Indian troops. The fighting is bitter, with great losses on both sides. But as a politically shrewd man, the Maharaja forms alliances with certain factions in China, which results in further division within the country. Realizing it is a lost cause, the Chinese nationalists and communists sign a peace treaty with India, the terms of which include Indian suzerainty over Tibet, Xinjiang, Xikang, Qinghai, and Gansu.

India is now in possession of a vast empire, and the largest manpower reserve on earth. It then takes time to consolidate its gains before attempting to annex further territory.
Interesting scenario.

That said, though, I strongly doubt that India would actually have the logistics to capture Xinjiang. Plus, this might provoke Soviet military intervention on the Chinese side.
 
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Jun 2018
136
New Hampshire
#8
Interesting scenario.

That said, though, I strongly doubt that India would actually have the logistics to capture Xinjiang. Plus, this might provoke Soviet military intervention on the Chinese side.
That is certainly a possibility. Though in the scenario I envision, China is not yet unified. But is at the height of its civil war. Though the Soviets may still intervene in this situation.

It is an interesting topic for thought. I wonder what would happen if the Soviets got involved.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
14,371
SoCal
#9
That is certainly a possibility. Though in the scenario I envision, China is not yet unified. But is at the height of its civil war. Though the Soviets may still intervene in this situation.

It is an interesting topic for thought. I wonder what would happen if the Soviets got involved.
Even if China's civil war isn't over yet, the Soviets might still intervene because they might not want a super-expansionist India. Please remember that Stalin's Soviet Union was very much a status quo power and that even its occupation of Eastern Europe was meant to secure the Soviet western flank in the event of yet another Great War.

As for what would happen if the Soviets got involved, the same thing would happen as what happened in Manchuria in 1945--expect with the Indians replacing the Japanese as the party who is going to get its butts kicked by the Soviets. The Soviet Army was very strong after defeating Nazi Germany and could easily defeat any Asian power during this time.
 
Likes: Swamp Booger
Jun 2018
136
New Hampshire
#10
Even if China's civil war isn't over yet, the Soviets might still intervene because they might not want a super-expansionist India. Please remember that Stalin's Soviet Union was very much a status quo power and that even its occupation of Eastern Europe was meant to secure the Soviet western flank in the event of yet another Great War.

As for what would happen if the Soviets got involved, the same thing would happen as what happened in Manchuria in 1945--expect with the Indians replacing the Japanese as the party who is going to get its butts kicked by the Soviets. The Soviet Army was very strong after defeating Nazi Germany and could easily defeat any Asian power during this time.
Agreed. If the technologically advanced and militarily powerful Soviets got involved, India would probably sue for peace while at the same time shrewdly attempting to maintain as much of its territorial concessions as possible. Perhaps getting Nepal, Bhutan, Tibet, and Burma out of the deal? While having to cede its Chinese conquests?
 
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