How do yow imagine shopping in Trajan's mall? 150 shops

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,726
There was possible some writing adverts but not many indication of signage. In some letters there is mentioned hawkers/criers but more likely the shops specialized in certain goods and the wares were obvious from the walkways.

There is a huge amount of graffiti mentioning goods sellers so perhaps it was a regular competition between vendors to employee graffiti writers to draw business rather than posting more official signage.
 
Aug 2018
131
digital world
There was possible some writing adverts but not many indication of signage. In some letters there is mentioned hawkers/criers but more likely the shops specialized in certain goods and the wares were obvious from the walkways.

There is a huge amount of graffiti mentioning goods sellers so perhaps it was a regular competition between vendors to employee graffiti writers to draw business rather than posting more official signage.
So, they didn't yell from every store
:zany:
 
Mar 2018
890
UK
I imagine it would be something like the Bazaars that you can still visit in Turkey. Small crowded shops with lots of colours, smells and shouting.
 

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,726
I imagine it would be something like the Bazaars that you can still visit in Turkey. Small crowded shops with lots of colours, smells and shouting.
Yes, that is how I picture it as well. Probably a bit less light and lots of porters standing by to carry purchases is only additional thing to some bazaars that you can still visit.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,369
Italy, Lago Maggiore
We've got Pompeii to observe how Romans used advertising. Generally in quarters known to host markets there was an obvious form of verbal advertising [you can note this still today in Italian street markets ... some sellers scream offering their goods at an incredible price!]. But in very important places [overall where a lot of persons passed] there were real advertising posters. The most beautiful ones were mosaics.


Among these ones there is also a sample of "international advertising" ... Near Rome, at Ostia [the sea port of Rome] there is a mosaic adertising the corporation [a kind of "gilda"] of the ship owners of Carthage [the new one, the one created by the Romans]. So if a rich Roman wanted to buy commercial vessels on the other side of the sea ... there was a nice poster suggesting to him who to contact ... The only problem in this case is that the rich Roman had to go to Carthage [or to send someone there] ... fax, internet and smartphones weren't ...