How Does Laos Exist?

Theodoric

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,926
Yötebory Sveriya
If you're into space and David Bowie, you likely know of Chris Hadfield. His son Evan has been going around the world doing semi-historical bite-sized documentaries. While this one doesn't dig too much into interviews like some of his others, it's still a moving piece.

This video talks about Laos and its recent history. How even against extraordinary hardships and impossible opponents, they persevered and achieved their current state against the odds.

 
Last edited:
Nov 2015
1,747
Bye, bye
It's because of their culture and their traditions, the national symbolic animal is the elephant.
Things are immutable, the same goes for Laos.
Religion plays a role too.
The true strength is patience, screaming or getting upset is a weakness.
I remember a Laotian proverb: "When elephants fight, ants die".
Why do you want that Laotian fight against or for elephants?
They didn't do it.
They are and will be.


 
Last edited:
Nov 2015
1,747
Bye, bye
They're hardly immutable. They were once a monarchy. Now they're a communist dictatorship.
Maybe but they are always the same country.
They don't care of communism, after that it will be something else.
Monarchy it's different because it's part of their national identity.
But don't try too much to think like a Westerner, or a Japanese.
Go to Laos........and let serenity and nonchalance invade you.:relieved:
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,205
T'Republic of Yorkshire
They don't care of communism.
Monarchy it's different because it's part of their national identity.
But don't try too much to think like a Westerner, or a Japanese.
Go to Laos........and let serenity and nonchalance invade you.:relieved:
I know quite a lot about Laos as it happens. I've lived in Thailand. I can just about read and understand Laotian, if they speak slowly.

They don't think much about communism? They thought enough about it to fight a civil war, overthrow a monarchy and institute purges against the Hmong.

How much time have you spent there? How good is your Laotian?
 

Dreamhunter

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
7,482
Malaysia
Sometimes, in fact quite often I reckon, the ordinary people do not really hv much say on how events turn in their land. It's the big guys in power that do. And perhaps in Laos, as also in not a few other places, what has happened was that those big guys happened to hv been those aligned with certain poles of power in their world at that time, who also happened to be more predisposed to certain political doctrines, which were not necessarily conducive or favourable to economic growth & development.

I've been there couple of times, about a decade ago. They're simple friendly folks, but also with wishes & dreams just like everybody else. There were only two decent sized shopping complexes in the whole capital city. They got a lot of catching up to do, I guess.

They like to eat gelatinous rice, a bit like their Thai/T'ai kinsmen, I guess. And they dip it directly into some chilli sauce sometimes. Very unique.
 
Last edited:
Jun 2017
179
Algeria
Confused. What is question for here thread? Is thread title the question posed or OP exist to share rhetorical youtube video?
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,205
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Sometimes, in fact quite often I reckon, the ordinary people do not really hv much say on how events turn in their land. It's the big guys in power that do. And perhaps in Laos, as also in not a few other places, what has happened was that those big guys happened to hv been those aligned with certain poles of power in their world at that time, who also happened to be more predisposed to certain political doctrines, which were not necessarily conducive or favourable to economic growth & development.

I've been there couple of times, about a decade ago. They're simple friendly folks, but also with wishes & dreams just like everybody else. There were only two decent sized shopping complexes in the whole capital city. They got a lot of catching up to do, I guess.

They like to eat gelatinous rice, a bit like their Thai/T'ai kinsmen, I guess. And they dip it directly into some chilli sauce sometimes. Very unique.
Glutinous rice is a staple in the north-eastern, or Isaan region of Thailand, not the country as a whole - the reason being that it grows better in drier areas than the long-grain rice variety eaten in the rest of the country. The people of north-eastern Thailand are culturally and ethnically close to the Lao, and a lot of them speak Laotian as well as Thai - the two languages are mutually intelligible.