How effectively do you think It & Stranger Things portray the 80’s?

Oct 2017
243
America ??
These two have been the most popular 80’s retro shows by far, at least within this decade (10’s).

There’s likewise been a bunch of recent movies & shows set in the 90’s as well, & I’d imagine more to come.
 

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,778
Iraq
I read a review of It that pointed out how the kids would be gone from home for extended periods of time without their parents getting upset. This is probably due to the book taking place in the 50s unlike the movie.

Parents by the 80s were more protective.
 
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antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,778
Iraq
It’s also a little strange in It how the boy doesn’t run away screaming when he sees the clown in the storm drain.

It would make a bit more sense maybe in the 50s when clowns were not usually considered scary.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,205
T'Republic of Yorkshire
It’s also a little strange in It how the boy doesn’t run away screaming when he sees the clown in the storm drain.

It would make a bit more sense maybe in the 50s when clowns were not usually considered scary.
Maybe Pennywise had some kind of beguiling power. It's been a long time since I read the novel.
 
Feb 2016
586
ROK
Movies rarely depict accurately. Most of the movies' main aim is to entertain. People would become bored quickly if they watch the same routines and plots as theirs. And to get a story in the way a director or a writer wants, a lot of them made the characters do stupid mistakes, especially in a lot of the 80s horror flicks. (I don't know if they do this now. When I was in the States, I saw people yell at the movie characters if they put themselves into danger (like split up from a group or enter a dark place)).

And the movie It shows just a suburban area. (I didn't watch Stranger Things). Like today, not every area in the United States was a suburban area during the 80s. Like today, the world and in the United States alone were very diverse. There were less suburban areas back then since this was before the housing developments that occurred later on. There were already suburban areas, but a lot of the current suburban areas and towns were smaller or rural regions during the 80s. The boarding school that I went to in the States during the early 90s used to be in a rural area with vast forests. That area grew into a town about a decade later.

During the 80s, when people thought of skyscrapers, they usually thought of the US cities such as NYC or Chicago. The other cities especially outside the US had much less skyscrapers. Many of today's developed nations in Asia were less developed during the 80s. Cities such as Los Angeles, Houston, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Tokyo, etc already had tall buildings, but these cities had much less tall buildings when compared to how many they have now.
 
Last edited:
Jan 2019
127
Finland
I read a review of It that pointed out how the kids would be gone from home for extended periods of time without their parents getting upset. This is probably due to the book taking place in the 50s unlike the movie.

Parents by the 80s were more protective.
Sounds like they might be projecting their own experience of the 80s and the show not being the same as a criticism? Why would they assume that all parents were the same or all regions/communities/social circles? The US had the hysteria about 'stranger danger' and 'satanic panic' in the 80s which no doubt lead to parents becoming more protective (even if under false pretenses) but I really doubt it would have been uniform.