How is Cuba still standing?

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,541
Portugal
#41
That actually might be the solution, life on a tropical island under communism is obviously better than life in the cold of Eastern Europe, especially with the Cuban Americans sending money back to their families.
Cuba is far from being the only country in the world receiving remittances from migrants. That is a quite standard world economic event since al least the 19th century in the migrant movements. Without thinking much we can have dozens of similar situations and most of them aren’t even related with nominally communist countries.
 
May 2013
395
Hays Kansas (ex Australian)
#43
Cuba is far from being the only country in the world receiving remittances from migrants. That is a quite standard world economic event since al least the 19th century in the migrant movements. Without thinking much we can have dozens of similar situations and most of them aren’t even related with nominally communist countries.

A lot of nations have reciprocal pension agreements as well.
 
Jul 2017
335
Argentina
#44
Life in a tropical island under "Communism" can also be better (and longer) than life in a tropical island under "Capitalism".
Hey Pict.
I think you've just hitted on one of the crucial nails.
As soon as you google about longevity cases, Cuba appears right behind Japan and USA and far above lots of other countries for wich no blog is questioning "how are they standibg".
That can't be just coincidence.
 
Jul 2017
126
Europe
#45
It's about the ideology really. Opening to America and the rest of the world economically and politically would sure mean abandoning the ideology of communism and accepting "the evil capitalism" Cuba fought against throughout decades. How would they explain it to the people that Capitalism isn't that bad after all and they had been brainwashing it's people into believing Imperialistic America is evil and an enemy of the socialist state.

Another thing is if Cuba opens up to the world, the whole system would collapse. That's why the ruling party is reluctant when it comes to economic liberalisation. On the other hand, the US government is under pressure too not to allow Castro the easy way out by allowing Cuba any benefits. There is a sizeable Cuban community in the US that opposes any deals with Cuba until Castro is ousted.
 
Aug 2014
1,170
Portugal
#49
His brother Raul Castro is ruling now. Same policies and ideology, nothing much has changed.
Nothing much has changed since when?

There are foreign investors in Cuba, from Canada to Western Europe. There are also worker-owned cooperatives and self-employment enterprises (in my opinion this is more Socialist than State centralized planning).

There are also less restrictions for Cubans to travel. And of course, there's tourism.


It's about the ideology really. Opening to America and the rest of the world economically and politically would sure mean abandoning the ideology of communism and accepting "the evil capitalism" Cuba fought against throughout decades.
It depends of what you mean by "opening to the rest of the world". This island became very relevant in the world, especially in Africa and South America.

Many countries benefited from Cuban healthcare system and the World Health Organization praised them for that. Their role in the world is undeniable. Even the US investigators can now study the lung cancer vaccine created in Cuba.

Things are a little more complex than what you describe, I think.

And maybe you are also involved in ideology.



Another thing is if Cuba opens up to the world, the whole system would collapse. That's why the ruling party is reluctant when it comes to economic liberalisation.
"Communists" and former "Communists" are still in power in the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa, even after "opening up" their countries to "Capitalism".
 
Jun 2019
1
london
#50
I think these days there is progress and optimism about the future in Cuba but depressingly enough the future will see corruption and crime as the country moves from its socialist principles to more freedoms and private ventures. I haven't been there for a while (I collect Cuban posters so have an interest) but I see some of the Cuban agencies such as OSPAAAL being less and less influential on the world stage and as socialism in its rawest form fails in country after country (Venezuela being the prime example)
 
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