How is D-Day viewed and remembered by the French people nowadays?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#1
How is D-Day (the Allied liberation of France beginning with the Normandy invasion on June 6, 1944) viewed and remembered by the French people nowadays?
 
Mar 2019
1,192
Kansas
#2
How is D-Day (the Allied liberation of France beginning with the Normandy invasion on June 6, 1944) viewed and remembered by the French people nowadays?
The French remember and appreciate what happened. At the last ceremony the other day the French President handed out 5 Legions Of Honour to the veterans.

In WW1 ANZACs fought a savage battle around the town of Pozieres in France. To say thank you the Australian flag flies over the village permanently. And the school children of the village sing the Australian national anthem on the anniversary of the battle each year!
 
Oct 2013
14,266
Europix
#3
In 2006, France awarded Huang Tingxin, who participated at the D-Day (on board of the HMS Searcher) "the Legion d'honneur".

Huang Tingxin died last year, at the age of 91. He was the last Chinese veteran participating at D-Day.
 
Oct 2013
14,266
Europix
#4
The memory is still alive in Normandy, and French (be them individuals, institutions, the state) keep that memory alive.

You can find French testimonies at the Bloody Gulch Memorial Museum, for example.

The museum had the good idea to make them available online, moreover, to put them in English (D-Day: the testimonies of civilians around Carentan) and in German (Landung: das Zeugnis von Zivilisten) too, not just in French.
 
Feb 2016
4,342
Japan
#5
They fought in it and were liberated by it so I imagine they remember it positively.
Though there might be some regional variation.
Caen was bombed terribly, many civilian casualties, for them it might be a more solemn occasion.
 
Likes: Futurist
Nov 2010
1,269
Bordeaux
#6
They fought in it and were liberated by it so I imagine they remember it positively.
Though there might be some regional variation.
Caen was bombed terribly, many civilian casualties, for them it might be a more solemn occasion.
Indeed, there is some questionning on the bombings of cities, considering that research has shown that most of them had little to no military effect.
In many cases, as in Operation Epsom, initial bombings were often carried out regardless of inaccurate or limited intelligence, resulting in useless civilian deaths and zero disruption to the German defense organisation.

Still, gratitude prevails througout the country to this day.

As for the French who fought during Operation Overlord, the only unit participating in the operation on Day 1 was the Keifer Commando, 177 men in total.
More French nationals took part, but as part of British commandos and RAF pilots, not as "independent" French units.
French Armoured units landed a few weeks later and participated in the liberation of Paris.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,701
SoCal
#7
Indeed, there is some questionning on the bombings of cities, considering that research has shown that most of them had little to no military effect.
Yeah, this might have been the case for the bombings of German cities as well. AFAIK, the German war effort (in regards to production) peaked in mid-1944 or so even though the Allied bombing of Germany began much earlier than that.

I guess that it really does depend on how this was viewed without hindsight, though; did the Anglo-Americans think that this bombing would be beneficial to the Allied war effort?

In many cases, as in Operation Epsom, initial bombings were often carried out regardless of inaccurate or limited intelligence, resulting in useless civilian deaths and zero disruption to the German defense organisation.
This does make me wonder if the Allies should have waited for better intelligence before carrying out some of their bombing raids. Still, it was a total war and thus one might have had to think quickly.

Still, gratitude prevails througout the country to this day.
That makes sense. :)

As for the French who fought during Operation Overlord, the only unit participating in the operation on Day 1 was the Keifer Commando, 177 men in total.
What's their story?

More French nationals took part, but as part of British commandos and RAF pilots, not as "independent" French units.
French Armoured units landed a few weeks later and participated in the liberation of Paris.
Makes sense.
 
May 2017
914
France
#9
It was the beginning of two years of party because how could the french forget that Hitler was slowly exterminating the population whith the food s privations.All the levels of the responsabilities were in the hands of the worse people of our nation,the french nazis,sometimes worse than the germans.Fascists,gangsters,mouchards (to recuperate the money of the Jews) oportunists and others "profiteurs" of the system made the law,the justice and the repartition of the products of agriculture and industry.You cannot imagine the degree of perversity of the leaders of the collaboration.
 
Likes: Futurist
May 2017
914
France
#10
I know the case of the psychiatric hospitals.The leaders of this administration were not doctors but political servants of the Vichy s regime,excellent specialists of the trafic of the foods s tickets.They became very rich......the result,40 000 hospitalized people dead.
 
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