How likely were you to meet a minority in Europe in the Middle Ages?

Feb 2014
105
Australia
Even after 900 more years of occasional intermarriage between Jews and Christians it was still possible to identify a Jew by looks alone. Just ask any Nazi, or anyone who agreed with them on this question. Nazi propaganda is full of claims that "Jews look funny/odd/different" or "You can tell he's Jewish just by looking at him." These claims fell on receptive ears. I doubt the Nazis would have made these claims if there was no credibility to the statement that Jews did look different than non-Jews. If this claim wasn't credible, there were so many other claims the Nazis could have made instead.

Even if there were no outward biological differences, there could be cultural differences - choices in fashion, hair style, name choices, etc.
You mean how they were able to identify....
 

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,151
Bulgaria
Well if he was a berber and from the Holy Land, he was immigrant anyway - or his family was!!
I assumed that he is a Berber, imdb and wiki page about this movie claim that the character in question is in fact an Arab. In the previous movie from 1991 Morgan Freeman' Azeem is a Moor, which is a broader term / the Muslim inhabitants of early and high medieval Magreb & Southern Iberia, which makes more sense and indeed as you noted an immigrant in the Holy Land.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,764
SoCal
Even after 900 more years of occasional intermarriage between Jews and Christians it was still possible to identify a Jew by looks alone. Just ask any Nazi, or anyone who agreed with them on this question. Nazi propaganda is full of claims that "Jews look funny/odd/different" or "You can tell he's Jewish just by looking at him." These claims fell on receptive ears. I doubt the Nazis would have made these claims if there was no credibility to the statement that Jews did look different than non-Jews. If this claim wasn't credible, there were so many other claims the Nazis could have made instead.

Even if there were no outward biological differences, there could be cultural differences - choices in fashion, hair style, name choices, etc.
There is actually a direct Hitler quote on this topic from Hitler's Table Talk:

 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,764
SoCal
Give at least a 0,5% chance, the Hungarian raids were just a few generations away in the year 1000, maybe they also left around some of their seed among the local women that could still be visible back then :))
Did the early Magyars look much more like Siberians than like present-day Magyars?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,764
SoCal
Say the year is 1000, how likely were you to meet someone who really looks non-native European in Silesia, Bohemia, or the Rhineland?
You could probably find Jews, maybe some Tatars or similar ethnic groups if you were lucky, but blacks, East Asians, South Asians (other than perhaps Gypsies/Roma), Southeast Asians, Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans? Probably not.

One person actually did an informal Twitter poll in regards to the number of blacks in Bohemia in 1403:


55% said 0 and 29% said 1-9.
 
May 2019
397
Earth
maybe some Tatars
Tatars in Silesia or the Rhineland in 1000 AD? Probably a 0% chance. The people we know today as Tatars were mostly formed by a mixing of Mongol and Turkic elements from the 13th century onward. Earlier "Tatars" in Europe, if we want to use "Tatar" as a vague term to describe nomadic Turkic people (I'm not even sure that term was used in western Europe in 1000 AD), would probably be people like Pechenegs, Cumans, and Kipchaks. I haven't seen any evidence of them going west of Hungary in the 11th century, although I'm willing to be proven wrong. You'd have some chance of finding them in places like Kievan Rus, Hungary, the Byzantine Empire, and Georgia though.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,764
SoCal
Tatars in Silesia or the Rhineland in 1000 AD? Probably a 0% chance. The people we know today as Tatars were mostly formed by a mixing of Mongol and Turkic elements from the 13th century onward. Earlier "Tatars" in Europe, if we want to use "Tatar" as a vague term to describe nomadic Turkic people (I'm not even sure that term was used in western Europe in 1000 AD), would probably be people like Pechenegs, Cumans, and Kipchaks. I haven't seen any evidence of them going west of Hungary in the 11th century, although I'm willing to be proven wrong. You'd have some chance of finding them in places like Kievan Rus, Hungary, the Byzantine Empire, and Georgia though.
Thanks for clarifying this part. I stand corrected.
 

Tulun

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
3,943
Western Eurasia
Did the early Magyars look much more like Siberians than like present-day Magyars?
I can't tell to what extent, but they certainly had some members who had mixed European-Asiatic (europo-mongoloid) features





(face reconstruction of an old Hungarian warrior from the first decades of the 10th century, his tomb was found in Benepuszta, Hungary. In his tomb there were also some coins of Berengar I, so he probably participated in some Italian raids)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
23,764
SoCal
I can't tell to what extent, but they certainly had some members who had mixed European-Asiatic (europo-mongoloid) features





(face reconstruction of an old Hungarian warrior from the first decades of the 10th century, his tomb was found in Benepuszta, Hungary. In his tomb there were also some coins of Berengar I, so he probably participated in some Italian raids)
Interesting. They do look a bit similar to, say, modern-day Central Asians.