How Many History Buffs with Historical Homes?

Feb 2019
769
Pennsylvania, US
#1
Just wondering if you guys are like me - in love with historical homes and the history to each particular one. Do you own or adore a particular historical home? Have any photos of your home or neat historical elements still intact? Was your home built or owned at one time by a a particular notable historical figure?

Usually I nearly crash my car ogling at the older homes as I drive around in historical areas... wondering who built them, if they are still somewhat original inside or completely modernized... this is a safer alternative! :lol:
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,564
San Antonio, Tx
#2
I’m an architect, now retired. My former office is still practicing and has somewhere around 40 people. Much of our practice was in historic preservation. We have restored hundreds of buildings, including the 18th c Spanish Colonial Missions of San Antonio and the Texas State Capitol in Austin. Historic Preservation is a field that is growing by leaps and bounds. When we started in historic preservation no one else was doing it. Architects ‘disdained’ working with older buildings.

Historic houses present similar challenges to historic commercial or institutional buildings. Most of our oldest houses that we restored were often built out of limestone with metal roofs. Porches were added built out of wood and painted in historic colors. As time passed, older houses came to be built using “balloon framing” out of wood because wood is just about the cheapest way to build small 1-3 (or more) story houses in America (and Canada). Brick and stone veneer construction overlaid on wood stud framing was/is common.
 
Feb 2019
769
Pennsylvania, US
#4
This was a house built by a local guy who was a little unconventional and perhaps had too much money to waste (Henry Chapman Mercer) - he produced quite his own style of architecture, though! Everything is irregular, from the rise and run of steps to the sizes of every door, every room dimension, etc. Henry Mercer ran a tile works, making a sort of Moravian style art tile during the American Arts/Crafts movement... the tiles are incorporated everywhere: all over the floors, walls, ceilings...

Here are images from his home, called Fonthill, built in 1908...

fonthill 4.jpg


From the top of the tallest roof on the house, Henry would light bonfires so that it could be seen in the surrounding town... perhaps mainly to annoy his brother, William, who was a little more tasteful (he lived in a sort of Tudor revival manor down the street).

Fonthill 3.jpg fonthill2.jpg fonthill.jpg fonthill 6.jpg

I love how bizarrely beautiful it is...


fonthill 7.jpg
 
Jun 2018
157
New York
#5
I interned in a historical home turned museum for two years. Built in the great depression in the Early Medieval Romanesque style (it was basically the keep of a castle). It still amazes me how much new things I was still seeing after spending so much time in there.

Historical homes are some of my favorite places to go and look at from a distance. The intimate history contained within never fails to catch my interest along with how things were built and what was incorporated into the building.
 
Likes: Niobe

GogLais

Ad Honorem
Sep 2013
5,445
Wirral
#6
This was a house built by a local guy who was a little unconventional and perhaps had too much money to waste (Henry Chapman Mercer) - he produced quite his own style of architecture, though! Everything is irregular, from the rise and run of steps to the sizes of every door, every room dimension, etc. Henry Mercer ran a tile works, making a sort of Moravian style art tile during the American Arts/Crafts movement... the tiles are incorporated everywhere: all over the floors, walls, ceilings...

Here are images from his home, called Fonthill, built in 1908...

View attachment 21000


From the top of the tallest roof on the house, Henry would light bonfires so that it could be seen in the surrounding town... perhaps mainly to annoy his brother, William, who was a little more tasteful (he lived in a sort of Tudor revival manor down the street).

View attachment 21001 View attachment 21002 View attachment 21003 View attachment 21004

I love how bizarrely beautiful it is...


View attachment 21005
Superb. I’ll have some of whatever he was on.
 
Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#7
This was a house built by a local guy who was a little unconventional and perhaps had too much money to waste (Henry Chapman Mercer) - he produced quite his own style of architecture, though! Everything is irregular, from the rise and run of steps to the sizes of every door, every room dimension, etc. Henry Mercer ran a tile works, making a sort of Moravian style art tile during the American Arts/Crafts movement... the tiles are incorporated everywhere: all over the floors, walls, ceilings...

Here are images from his home, called Fonthill, built in 1908...

View attachment 21000


From the top of the tallest roof on the house, Henry would light bonfires so that it could be seen in the surrounding town... perhaps mainly to annoy his brother, William, who was a little more tasteful (he lived in a sort of Tudor revival manor down the street).

View attachment 21001 View attachment 21002 View attachment 21003 View attachment 21004

I love how bizarrely beautiful it is...


View attachment 21005
Bizarre and beautiful indeed. I would love to decorate that place, if I had the money.

My family owns an old renovated parish school in the north of Sweden. The frame is timber, from the mid-late 1800s, in the typical "red and white" rural Swedish style. It's a somewhat strange feeling, having your living room as the previous main hall. They've kept the organ. I also found an old edition (1920s) of a hardened map of the Eastern Mediterannean at the time of Augustus.

I've been meaning to requisition that one, as no one but me seems to like it...
 
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Likes: Niobe
Feb 2019
769
Pennsylvania, US
#9
My family owns an old renovated parish school in the north of Sweden. The frame is timber, from the mid-late 1800s, in the typical "red and white" rural Swedish style. It's a somewhat strange feeling, having your living room as the previous main hall. They've kept the organ. I also found an old edition (1920s) of a hardened map of the Eastern Mediterannean at the time of Augustus.

I've been meaning to requisition that one, as no one but me seems to like it...
Oh, man.... if you have photos, please share them (if that's not too weird to ask)... it sounds absolutely amazing! I love that they kept the organ, too.

(P.S.: I think you said you liked Last Kingdom, right, @NordicDemosthenes? Season 3 is :yes:)
 
Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#10
Oh, man.... if you have photos, please share them (if that's not too weird to ask)... it sounds absolutely amazing! I love that they kept the organ, too.

(P.S.: I think you said you liked Last Kingdom, right, @NordicDemosthenes? Season 3 is :yes:)
It's fine! It's a small organ though - not a church-sized one (just guarding against eventual dissapointment).

I'll ransack my Dad's laptop next time I have the ability! :D The place looks pretty amazing in the winter...
(Otherwise I'll be going there late July).

Yes I do! Thanks for the tip - I might be going double AWOL for tomorrow... ;)
 

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