How Many History Buffs with Historical Homes?

Feb 2019
660
Pennsylvania, US
#21
Cornelius keeps to himself. One actually only knows he's there by the things he does. Actually, there are several houses in the town that are haunted. One--a lovely old house that was built by the brother of a governor of Maine--has ghosts so hostile that it is always coming up for sale (no one wants to live there). There has been so much spectral activity in this town that the Paranormal Society is a regular visitor.
He sounds like a low maintenance sort of housemate. That's pretty wild about the "haunted" house that is constantly changing hands. Very creepy! Why do you think your town has such a large spectral population?

I don't think there are any ghosts in my house. There are flying squirrels in the attic... but that's about it. :lol:
 
Jun 2017
351
maine
#22
Perhaps because this is one way to explain the inexplicable. When I bought this house--from Cornelius' great-great nephew, I was told about him. He was a real person (I have done his genealogy and his history); he had a sort of sad story--but nothing to warrant a scary tale. He is a harmless soul but belief that he is here--and that he does specific things--explains a lot that my engineering brothers would attribute to natural phenomena. The hostile ghosts may represent nothing more sinister than an old house settling. The ghosts which have been seen may be little more than those specters we catch out of the "corner of the eye" that answer some emotion. It is possible that the orbs of light may have their origin in perfectly natural causes. Once a person (or a town) believes in them, they exist. My neighbor cannot control the world around her but she can negotiate with the sea captain in the attic.
 
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MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,847
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#23
This was a house built by a local guy who was a little unconventional and perhaps had too much money to waste (Henry Chapman Mercer) - he produced quite his own style of architecture, though! Everything is irregular, from the rise and run of steps to the sizes of every door, every room dimension, etc. Henry Mercer ran a tile works, making a sort of Moravian style art tile during the American Arts/Crafts movement... the tiles are incorporated everywhere: all over the floors, walls, ceilings...

Here are images from his home, called Fonthill, built in 1908...

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From the top of the tallest roof on the house, Henry would light bonfires so that it could be seen in the surrounding town... perhaps mainly to annoy his brother, William, who was a little more tasteful (he lived in a sort of Tudor revival manor down the street).

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I love how bizarrely beautiful it is...


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I took a tour of Fonthill once, long ago. It is certainly a strange and impressive place. I think that the only other historical houses I ever visited were Wheatland in Lancaster, PA, the Charles Demuth House in Lancaster, Mount Vernon, VA, and the Emlen Physick House in Cape May, New Jersey.

I once stopped at Elkins Park PA just to walk over and look at Lynnwood hall from outside the fence.
 
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Jun 2017
351
maine
#24
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These are two area historical houses. The first is in Skowhegan, Maine. A Greek Revival cottage built in 1839, it was purchased by a wealthy and well-connected local historian for use as a town museum--which is still its purpose today.

This second house is the McCartney House in Oakland, Maine. It was build circa 1815 and, today, is home to the Oakland Area Historical Society. It is a museum dedicated to the town of Oakland and to a wonderful collection of axes.
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Jun 2017
351
maine
#25
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These are two area historical houses. The first is in Skowhegan, Maine. A Greek Revival cottage built in 1839, it was purchased by a wealthy and well-connected local historian for use as a town museum--which is still its purpose today.

This second house is the McCartney House in Oakland, Maine. It was build circa 1815 and, today, is home to the Oakland Area Historical Society. It is a museum dedicated to the town of Oakland and to a wonderful collection of axes.
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Two historical houses in Fairfield, Maine. The first is a Queen Anne Victorian which was built by a factory owner and which is now home to the Fairfield Historical Society. The 2nd is the Connor-Bovie House which was built shortly before the Civil War by a brother of Gov. Selden Connor and occupied by Dr. Bovie (inventor of the "bloodless knife"). The 3rd was built by local entrepreneur Amos Gerald (who believed that a Man's Home is his Castle) and today houses a funeral home (sic transit gloria mundi).
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Jun 2018
151
New York
#27
Two historical houses in Fairfield, Maine. The first is a Queen Anne Victorian which was built by a factory owner and which is now home to the Fairfield Historical Society. The 2nd is the Connor-Bovie House which was built shortly before the Civil War by a brother of Gov. Selden Connor and occupied by Dr. Bovie (inventor of the "bloodless knife"). The 3rd was built by local entrepreneur Amos Gerald (who believed that a Man's Home is his Castle) and today houses a funeral home (sic transit gloria mundi).
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The funeral home is certainly different. I like it, would probably go crazy if I saw it in person. Got to love it when people take the words they believe and legitimately apply that to their lives, especially when in means building a house.
 
Feb 2019
660
Pennsylvania, US
#28
I took a tour of Fonthill once, long ago. It is certainly a strange and impressive place. I think that the only other historical houses I ever visited were Wheatland in Lancaster, PA, the Charles Demuth House in Lancaster, Mount Vernon, VA, and the Emlen Physick House in Cape May, New Jersey.

I once stopped at Elkins Park PA just to walk over and look at Lynnwood hall from outside the fence.
The way they have the Emlen Physick house decorated and full of period appropriate "props" makes it feel like you are in the Victorian era... the aesthetic is so different (so busy and with such gaudy colors) and going through that house makes you feel like you are fully immersed in the late 1800's.

This was the combination that got me - the carved wood, the faint Asian-influence wallpaper pattern, and the almost Italian feeling olive motif on the decorative metal paneling on the lower half of the walls... Those Victorians had quite a penchant for cramming as much texture and color into a space as was humanly possible. :lol:

emlen physick.jpg
 
Feb 2019
660
Pennsylvania, US
#29
Two historical houses in Fairfield, Maine. The first is a Queen Anne Victorian which was built by a factory owner and which is now home to the Fairfield Historical Society. The 2nd is the Connor-Bovie House which was built shortly before the Civil War by a brother of Gov. Selden Connor and occupied by Dr. Bovie (inventor of the "bloodless knife"). The 3rd was built by local entrepreneur Amos Gerald (who believed that a Man's Home is his Castle) and today houses a funeral home (sic transit gloria mundi).
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The Connor-Bovie house is interesting! It almost looks like it has some Italianate influences...
 
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