How Many History Buffs with Historical Homes?

Jun 2017
342
maine
#31
The funeral home is certainly different. I like it, would probably go crazy if I saw it in person. Got to love it when people take the words they believe and legitimately apply that to their lives, especially when in means building a house.
I've been told that it was built totally in concrete--without a single nail (this would be on the outside only, of course).
 
Likes: Niobe
Jun 2017
342
maine
#32
The Connor-Bovie house is interesting! It almost looks like it has some Italianate influences...
It is considered to be a good example of Classic Greek Revival, combined with Italianate. It is also the house with the hostile ghosts. Because I knew former owners, I was able to crawl through this house--it is impressive on both inside and outside.
 
Likes: Niobe
Aug 2010
16,202
Welsh Marches
#33
bc3.jpg

This is the family house in SW England where I spent a fair amount of my earlier life. The tower, which dates, to about 1425, originally stood in front of the facade of the main building, and was thus open on three sides. The wing to the right was built in the early 19th Century, and that on the left at the beginning of the 18th Century, with the Gothic bay windows of the ground-floor drawing room being added later in that century I think. What survives of the old medieval manor house lies behind these wings, with a galleried great hall running back and to the right as one passes in through the front door. The roof of the medieval chapel, with fine carved timbers, has survived behind the front roof on the left but is not exposed (or at least was not). The house once belonged to Sir Frediando Gorges, the founder of the state of Maine, and later passed into the possession of a family of Bristol merchants. My bedroom was in the tower, one had to pass up to it by a narrow stone winding starircase. The house passed out of the family and I haven't seen it for forty years.
 
Jun 2017
342
maine
#34
Sir Frediando Gorges, the founder of the state of Maine
An aside: Sir Ferdinando Gorges and John Popham were the first Enlishmen to colonize in Maine (the Popham Plantation was established in the same year as Jamestown). Sir Ferdinando was instrumental in the founding of the Maine Court system. He was extremely important to Maine history but the Eurpoean establishment within Maine was French (1604)--this is, of course, discounting the Scandinavians.
 
Likes: Niobe
Aug 2010
16,202
Welsh Marches
#35
Thank you, I must admit that I know very little about the good Sir Ferdinando (typo now corrected!).

The main thing that I remember about him is the 'gurges' (heraldic representation of a whirlpool) that appeared in his arms, in canting reference to his name:

Heraldic_gurges_(whirlpool)_Gorges.svg.png

It was depicted on a shield set on the gallery in the hall.
 
Last edited:

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,976
Lorraine tudesque
#36
Whoa! That wall is pretty impressive - the gradient, aged patina on it is beautiful as well!
This one is the third one on this place. Second one was destroyed by the Swedes in the 30 years war.

And before there was a Roman Burgus.( Watchtower)

The place has cellars, hiden rooms, ghost.
 
Likes: Niobe
Sep 2017
720
United States
#37
Ok, there’s two. I don’t own them directly, my grandparents do, but I think it’s close enough!

They own an old stagecoach stop in Granite, Colorado that was active in the 19th Century. It even has an escape tunnel in case of native attack. They’ve adorned it with the stuffing and skins of every animal you can think of, paintings, muzzle-loaders, gas lamps, and so on too.

They also own a Victorian-style house in Pueblo, Colorado. Cast iron lion statues, that strange green carpet, bath on bronze legs, whole set up. I’m not sure when exactly it was built but it was built whenever Victorian influence reached the U.S., and is recognized as a historical site. They also have that house stuffed with antiques and paintings, I saw my first phallic imagery there on a pair of Greek statues! They also have some questionable figures of maids in a golliwog/sambo style which I’m sure they’ve hidden by now.
 
Likes: Niobe
Feb 2019
649
Pennsylvania, US
#38
View attachment 21093

This is the family house in SW England where I spent a fair amount of my earlier life. The tower, which dates, to about 1425, originally stood in front of the facade of the main building, and was thus open on three sides. The wing to the right was built in the early 19th Century, and that on the left at the beginning of the 18th Century, with the Gothic bay windows of the ground-floor drawing room being added later in that century I think. What survives of the old medieval manor house lies behind these wings, with a galleried great hall running back and to the right as one passes in through the front door. The roof of the medieval chapel, with fine carved timbers, has survived behind the front roof on the left but is not exposed (or at least was not). The house once belonged to Sir Frediando Gorges, the founder of the state of Maine, and later passed into the possession of a family of Bristol merchants. My bedroom was in the tower, one had to pass up to it by a narrow stone winding starircase. The house passed out of the family and I haven't seen it for forty years.
Having your room in the tower probably added somewhat to being 'sent to your room' (being 'sent to the tower' sounds so much more grim).
 
Aug 2010
16,202
Welsh Marches
#39
Having your room in the tower probably added somewhat to being 'sent to your room' (being 'sent to the tower' sounds so much more grim).
We had a large dog which could climb up the tower steps (which were extremely steep) but could not get down again; so if anyone left the door at the bottom open and he climbed up, sometimes to the very top, my father would have to struggle down carrying him in his arms. There was a rope at the side to hang on to.
 
Likes: duncanness
Jun 2018
151
New York
#40
We had a large dog which could climb up the tower steps (which were extremely steep) but could not get down again; so if anyone left the door at the bottom open and he climbed up, sometimes to the very top, my father would have to struggle down carrying him in his arms. There was a rope at the side to hang on to.
Steep stairs always make me nervous. Did these stairs spiral or nah? And poor dog, just wanted to be at the top of the world.

I ask about the stairs cause the building I worked in had steep spiral staircases, they never got any easier to climb.
 

Similar History Discussions