How many Israelis immigrated to The Soviet union?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
24,554
SoCal
Russia has one of the worlds largest Jewish populations today.


After the fall of the Soviet Union a # of Jewish Soviets immigrated to Israel, one wonders what was there story?
Their story (including those of my parents) was that they were seeking a better life and greener pastures in Israel. Most of them permanently stayed in Israel, though some (including my parents) subsequently moved to the US or elsewhere.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
24,554
SoCal
Do those percentages refer to the proportion of Jews in the overall population? As I understand it, Russia still has a significantly larger population than most European countries. So the number of Jews there may be larger than the number of Jews in separate individual European countries.
They refer to each country's share of the total global Jewish population.

Of all the countries in the world that have a Jewish population, Russia, especially if you include the Former Soviet Union countries, is easily in the top five.

Jews have been in Russia for over a thousand years. In the 20th century (also including the late 19th century), the direction of migration has been away from Russia to places like the US and Israel.
What's interesting is that Russia proper has a Jewish population today that is less than two times smaller than it was back in 1897, but Ukraine's Jewish population right now is about 98% smaller than it was in 1897--or in 1941, for that matter (in terms of total numbers, Ukraine's Jewish population didn't change very much between 1897 and 1941, probably in part due to mass Jewish emigration to the West). Before 1917, Jews generally couldn't settle in Russia proper. So, basically, Russia proper experienced a huge spike in its Jewish population between the 1910s and 1930s, followed by stability between the 1930s and 1950s, and followed by a rapid decline after 1959.
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
5,118
India
So, basically, Russia proper experienced a huge spike in its Jewish population between the 1910s and 1930s, followed by stability between the 1930s and 1950s, and followed by a rapid decline after 1959.
Why it declined after 1959.
 
Sep 2012
1,246
Tarkington, Texas
Actress Mila Kunis was born in the Ukraine and moved with her parents to the US. She speaks Russian and English.

Pruitt
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,214
Canary Islands-Spain
Russia has one of the worlds largest Jewish populations today.


After the fall of the Soviet Union a # of Jewish Soviets immigrated to Israel, one wonders what was there story?

Migration from USSR to Israel after 1989 account to 979,000, but it started much earlier, even before the creation of Israel

From many sources:

1880-1927 - 45,000
1948-1953 - 8,126
1954-1967 - 13,874
1968-1986 - 164,189
1989 alone - 71,000
1989-2006 - 979,000

From this one:

1919-1948 - 52,530
1948-1951 - 8,163
1952-1960 - 13,743
1961-1971 - 29,376
1972-1979 - 137,134
1980-1989 - 29,754
1990-2001 - 906,127
2002-2010 - 84,892





It is noteworthy to mention that the USSR created an autonomous area for Jews, the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, in Manchuria. At its peak in 1950, 45-50k Jews lived there and migration was promoted. However, its Jewish population declined and currently just 1,628 of them live there


In regard to Jewish population in Russia-USSR

Imperial Russia - 5,250,000

Russian Federation in 1939 - 891,147
Total USSR in 1939 - 3,028,538

Russia in 2010 - 159,348
Former USSR in 2010 - 280,678
 
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Jan 2012
502
South Midlands in Merlin's Isle of Gramarye
Somehow or other I can't see many Israelis migrating to Russia. If anything in recent years the flow has been in the other direction, causing radical changes in Zionism.

I fear this discussion has already fallen into the trap of conflating Israelis with Jews in general. There are other Israelis than just Jews, much as there are other Arabs than Muslims.

I conclude this with the question as how do you define a Jew? Do you take the Orthodox Jewish definition, the more relaxed Reform definition or the various anti-semitic definitions. The anti-semitic definitions are easy to spot as they always shows the Jews as taking over the world whether as communists or financiers. A tired, sickening overworked cliche of the whipping boy.
 

JoanOfArc007

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Dec 2015
4,160
USA
Their story (including those of my parents) was that they were seeking a better life and greener pastures in Israel. Most of them permanently stayed in Israel, though some (including my parents) subsequently moved to the US or elsewhere.
Interesting thank you. Your parents were from the USSR? How did they like the USSR?

Some Ex Soviets do miss the Soviet times this includes a former co worker of mine. He never lived in Israel though he was from Uzbekistan I believe.

Anyway there are a variety of questions I have in relation to the OP. One being what about Soviet born Jews that initially went to Israel in 1948 but in years that included a USSR and Israeli alliance ended up going back to live in The USSR after a brief stay in Israel? Im seeking to uncover this information, it may be a very small # of people that did such a thing but who knows?

We know of the Soviet Jews that did not enjoy their time in the USSR and went to live in the USA, Canada and in large numbers Israel. But other Soviet Jews stayed behind in the USSR. Even though the # of Jewish people in modern Russia is about 200,000 which is a small percentage of Jewish folks worldwide...

To this day Russia has a top ten Jewish population worldwide by country. This tells us that there would have been Soviet Jews that did not want to go to Israel during the time of 1948 the creation of Israel until the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. There would have been a # of reasons for this, one can imagine friends and family Jewish and non Jewish being the obvious, and this goes to the diversity of the Soviet Union.

When the USSR fell apart as we know this effected former Soviet areas differently. As fellow poster Frank shows almost 1 million Soviet/Russians immigrated to Israel after 1989, that is a very important stat. Of course of that # there is going to be diversity and of that # one can wonder how many of those folks ended up going back to live in Russia after perhaps not liking Israel, how many stayed in Israel feeling Israel was better then the USSR and what Russia today has to offer. Of the 979,000 Soviet/Russian Jewish folks that immigrated to Israel after 1989 now living in Israel...how many miss Russia or the Soviet times and how many are glad to now be in Israel?
 
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JoanOfArc007

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Dec 2015
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Somehow or other I can't see many Israelis migrating to Russia. If anything in recent years the flow has been in the other direction, causing radical changes in Zionism.

I fear this discussion has already fallen into the trap of conflating Israelis with Jews in general. There are other Israelis than just Jews, much as there are other Arabs than Muslims.

I conclude this with the question as how do you define a Jew? Do you take the Orthodox Jewish definition, the more relaxed Reform definition or the various anti-semitic definitions. The anti-semitic definitions are easy to spot as they always shows the Jews as taking over the world whether as communists or financiers. A tired, sickening overworked cliche of the whipping boy.
Somehow or other I can't see many Israelis migrating to Russia. If anything in recent years the flow has been in the other direction, causing radical changes in Zionism.

I fear this discussion has already fallen into the trap of conflating Israelis with Jews in general. There are other Israelis than just Jews, much as there are other Arabs than Muslims.

I conclude this with the question as how do you define a Jew? Do you take the Orthodox Jewish definition, the more relaxed Reform definition or the various anti-semitic definitions. The anti-semitic definitions are easy to spot as they always shows the Jews as taking over the world whether as communists or financiers. A tired, sickening overworked cliche of the whipping boy.
But of those Muslims and Christians in Israel/Palestine today, they had family in the country for a long time. Its not like they immigrated to Israel is it? Of All the Soviet people that went to Israel from 1948-1991 how many of them were Christian or Atheist, how many were Jewish?

Do you know of any stories of Soviets that did go to live in Israel after 1948 but ended up going back to live in The USSR perhaps after not being able to find work in Israel?

No animosity in this discussion. In fact my former Co worker whom was a Muslim from the USSR and enjoyed the USSR...had a Jewish commander during his time in the Soviet army. If anything we might be able to learn of more similar stories itt.
 
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Jan 2012
502
South Midlands in Merlin's Isle of Gramarye
The toughest Zionist I ever knew was an Armenian Christian. It is easy to work out why he ended up in Israel. The least tough was a Reserve IDF Lieutentant-Colonel I used to drink with when he was in London, who was very friendly to Arabs and Muslims when he didn't have to fight them. Cliches are the easiest bit. He showed me that through mutual respect peace was possible in the Middle East.

Migration to Israel in the early years was largely from European Jewry. The Holocaust was the main driver as many Jews had learned nobody they could only trust themselves. There may have been some displaced Soviet Jews from the war. I met some in London in the Sixties and Seventies, but why go to Israel when they had already settled and become UK citizens?

The Soviet ideal was expressed in the Soviet Army. By the Eighties their country might have been slowly falling apart and the party utterly corrupt, but the ideals of the founders persisted in some quarters. Who knows, these standards might return?
 
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JoanOfArc007

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Dec 2015
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The toughest Zionist I ever knew was an Armenian Christian. It is easy to work out why he ended up in Israel. The least tough was a Reserve IDF Lieutentant-Colonel I used to drink with when he was in London, who was very friendly to Arabs and Muslims when he didn't have to fight them. Cliches are the easiest bit. He showed me that through mutual respect peace was possible in the Middle East.

Migration to Israel in the early years was largely from European Jewry. The Holocaust was the main driver as many Jews had learned nobody they could only trust themselves. There may have been some displaced Soviet Jews from the war. I met some in London in the Sixties and Seventies, but why go to Israel when they had already settled and become UK citizens?

The Soviet ideal was expressed in the Soviet Army. By the Eighties their country might have been slowly falling apart and the party utterly corrupt, but the ideals of the founders persisted in some quarters. Who knows, these standards might return?
Well I know many good Jews live in Israel today. But when you say the toughest Zionist you know, did that guy have Jewish parents? Correct me if Im wrong, but one needs to be Jewish in order to get to Israel and that type of intolerance is why some Soviet Jews stayed true to the USSR they were proud of being able to fight the Nazis in WW2 for example. But also its true the Soviet Union was a bastion of diversity , love and tolerance and that was from its people not the Soviet Gov, same with the USA id say. Its the people that make the country. In additon to what you said, I know a ex Soviet Muslim that had a Jewish commander while serving the Soviet Border patrol. Its clear the USSR was welcoming of Jewish folks, after all masses of Soviet Jews were entrusted with Rifles, Tanks, RPGS and so much more such as positions of great power. And Im no communist but in fairness to truth its clear that many Soviet Jews preferred the USSR to Israel and thats fair.