How many Israelis immigrated to The Soviet union?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Why it declined after 1959.
Low birth rates and, after 1970, emigration.

Actress Mila Kunis was born in the Ukraine and moved with her parents to the US. She speaks Russian and English.

Pruitt
Yep, she was born in Chernivtsi. Chernivtsi had one-third of its Jewish population survive the Holocaust as a result of their mayor successfully pleading with the Romanian leadership to keep 20,000 Jews who were vital to Chernivtsi's economy.
 
Oct 2012
820
Well I know many good Jews live in Israel today. But when you say the toughest Zionist you know, did that guy have Jewish parents? Correct me if Im wrong, but one needs to be Jewish in order to get to Israel and that type of intolerance is why some Soviet Jews stayed true to the USSR they were proud of being able to fight the Nazis in WW2 for example. But also its true the Soviet Union was a bastion of diversity , love and tolerance and that was from its people not the Soviet Gov, same with the USA id say. Its the people that make the country. In additon to what you said, I know a ex Soviet Muslim that had a Jewish commander while serving the Soviet Border patrol. Its clear the USSR was welcoming of Jewish folks, after all masses of Soviet Jews were entrusted with Rifles, Tanks, RPGS and so much more such as positions of great power. And Im no communist but in fairness to truth its clear that many Soviet Jews preferred the USSR to Israel and thats fair.
You are of course right about the fact that many Soviet jews did not want to emigrate to Israel, what ever reasons, but on the other hand, emigration from that "bastion of tolerance and love" was suprisingly hard at times. Also many blacks in US were trusted with
rifles , tanks and such , does that mean the civil rights movement was all about nothing?
 
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Jan 2017
1,309
Durham
You are of course right about the fact that many Soviet jews did not want to emigrate to Israel
I don't know about Soviet Jews, but there appears to be an assumption in some quarters that 'Jews' saw themselves as Jewish first and as such were all hankering after a Jewish state. From the museums I have visited in Eastern Europe, that is not what I learned. Jews in those countries considered themselves to be Czechs or Poles and so on first and Jewish second, 'seems no different to being catholic or protestant. And then in Western Europe I don't think there was any great clamour to be part of a Jewish state.

The Jewish museum in Prague is one such museum. After WW2, Jews were hounded out of Czechoslovakia: they didn't leave by choice. And, the museum, which to me seemed to be put together by non Jews, made a point of noting their shame at that part of Czech history.

In terms of Soviet or Tsarist Jews, that may be different. They may not have wanted to join a Jewish state but when they had the opportunity large swathes certainly left in the 19th and 20th centuries to find better lives in places such as the United States and England. It seems from the figures posted on this board, that when the Soviet Union opened up and the opportunity arose again, many took that opportunity.
 
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Aug 2016
960
moscow, russia.
when the Soviet Union opened up and the opportunity arose again, many took that opportunity.
not that it 'opened up' but rather was destroyed, so it was no matter of 'opportunity' to be found abroad, but the lack of thereof in the destroyed home state.
 
Oct 2012
820
not that it 'opened up' but rather was destroyed, so it was no matter of 'opportunity' to be found abroad, but the lack of thereof in the destroyed home state.
So, the soviet citicens were free to travel or emigrate aboard, but choose not to, because the great opportunities offered at home?
 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
3,891
USA
You are of course right about the fact that many Soviet jews did not want to emigrate to Israel, what ever reasons, but on the other hand, emigration from that "bastion of tolerance and love" was suprisingly hard at times. Also many blacks in US were trusted with
rifles , tanks and such , does that mean the civil rights movement was all about nothing?
Well I feel the Soviet people were different from the Soviet Gov officials that were corrupt. Even the USSR also had honest policemen and gov officials. In some sense in the US south during Jim crow, there were bigoted US officials while there would have been American citizens that rejected the bigotry of Jim crow laws and of segregation at the restaurants and such.

The USSR had poverty issues but its interesting that the Soviet Gov would also publicly claim to be a place of tolerance while the Jim crow USA was a place of intolerance. The truth perhaps is somewhere in the middle though. Soviet Jews were always a part of the Soviet system, but black Americans at one point in US history were slaves and other then few token names there were not prominent black folks in the early USA. But the USSR had 500,000 Jews in its army in a time(ww2 era) when there was segregation in the USA, of that # at least 100 were prominent officers. Of course here in the modern times its interesting to note the USA is more liberal compared to Russia, so history has got us here.

And to the point of the thread. Yes there were numerous reasons Soviet Jews left for Israel, but of course many Soviet Jews stayed in the USSR, to this day Russia has a top ten Jewish population of the world. I admire US history because included in US history was the ending of segregation. And included in Soviet history was diversity. Soviet Jews that stayed in The USSR probably did not want to leave their Jewish and non Jewish Soviet friends and family.
 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
3,891
USA
What is of note in this conversation is that fact that a # of Muslim majority countries lost a huge portion of their Jewish populations after the creation of Israel in 1948. Perhaps Turkey and Iran are the exception but even those countries have lost sizable # of Jews. But as for other Muslim majority countries such as Iraq, Syria, Yemen and Afghanistan these countries have a very very small # of Jewish people when they used to have a much large Jewish population.

Amid the population transfers to Israel since 1948 Russia stands out as a country that still has maintained a very large Jewish population and that IMO clearly goes to the diversity and tolerance of the USSR. And the fact that the USSR and Israel did not go to war with each other as did the Arab Muslim majority countries and Israel for a time. And probably biggest of all the fact Soviet Jews played a role in defeating the Third Reich, I think alot of Jewish people even in Israel have a respect for the USSR for its fight against the Reich.
 
Jan 2012
442
South Midlands in Britain
He was an Armenian Christian. I think Israel appeared around his family when he was a child. He was aggressively anti-Palestinian despite some of them being Christians like him. The tragic experience of his people sat heavily with him. One can understand that.
 
Oct 2019
15
America
They refer to each country's share of the total global Jewish population.


What's interesting is that Russia proper has a Jewish population today that is less than two times smaller than it was back in 1897, but Ukraine's Jewish population right now is about 98% smaller than it was in 1897--or in 1941, for that matter (in terms of total numbers, Ukraine's Jewish population didn't change very much between 1897 and 1941, probably in part due to mass Jewish emigration to the West). Before 1917, Jews generally couldn't settle in Russia proper. So, basically, Russia proper experienced a huge spike in its Jewish population between the 1910s and 1930s, followed by stability between the 1930s and 1950s, and followed by a rapid decline after 1959.
Theres western immigration and on top of that the 900,000 Ukrainian Jews who died in the holocaust adding onto the top of that. That's probably a big chunk of the 98% decrease.
 
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