How many Poles moved into the "Recovered Territories" after the end of World War II?

Apr 2019
171
Europe
a third or more of the total population in 1950 lived east of the Curzon Line before the start of WWII in September 1939.
They were between 70% and 1% depending on county, and in total they were almost a third of the population.

Counties sorted by percent of inhabitants originating from east of the Curzon Line and Poles from abroad:
(Poles from abroad settled mainly in Bolesławiec - 46% of inhabitants - Zgorzelec and Wałbrzych counties)



In Bolesławiec half of the people were Poles from abroad, mainly Yugoslavia (had lived there since the 1800s):

 
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Apr 2019
171
Europe
Counties sorted by 1950 percent of autochthonous population (people with German citizenship in August 1939):

Tarnogórski = Tarnowskie Góry county (the city itself was part of Poland already in 1939, but the county was expanded by incorporation of some German areas in 1945, and the data about origins of population of this county refers only to areas annexed in 1945, not to the whole county - part of which was in Polish Upper Silesia already before WW2):

 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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SoCal
They were between 70% and 1% depending on county, and in total they were almost a third of the population.

Counties sorted by percent of inhabitants originating from east of the Curzon Line and Poles from abroad:
(Poles from abroad settled mainly in Bolesławiec - 46% of inhabitants - Zgorzelec and Wałbrzych counties)



In Bolesławiec half of the people were Poles from abroad, mainly Yugoslavia (had lived there since the 1800s):

I don't see 46% on the chart for Bolesławiec. :(
 
Apr 2019
171
Europe
I don't see 46% on the chart for Bolesławiec. :(
Because I combined Kresy origins with Abroad origins.

Bolesławiec had ca. 24% from Kresy (Soviet Union) and ca. 45% from abroad (= other countries), mainly from Yugoslavia, in total almost 70%.

Abroad (non-USSR, other countries) origins were only significant in 3 counties - Bolesławiec, Zgorzelec and Wałbrzych.

In total there were 150,000 people from abroad in the Recovered territories, compared to 1,600,000 from the Soviet Union.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,779
SoCal
Because I combined Kresy origins with Abroad origins.

Bolesławiec had ca. 24% from Kresy (Soviet Union) and ca. 45% from abroad (= other countries), mainly from Yugoslavia, in total almost 70%.

Abroad (non-USSR, other countries) origins were only significant in 3 counties - Bolesławiec, Zgorzelec and Wałbrzych.

In total there were 150,000 people from abroad in the Recovered territories, compared to 1,600,000 from the Soviet Union.
Thanks for clarifying. :)

Anyway, what were Poles doing in Yugoslavia?
 
Apr 2019
171
Europe
When it comes to Poles from abroad, the main groups were Poles from West/Central Germany (57,516), Poles from France (54,576) and probably Poles from Yugoslavia.

Anyway, what were Poles doing in Yugoslavia?
I didn't even know about them until I started researching this. Apparently they settled there in the 1800s, so they lived theere for one hundred years before coming back:

http://www.rocznikboleslawiecki.pl/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/rocznik_2014_prezentacja.pdf
 
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Apr 2019
171
Europe
Interesting. What were Poles doing in Yugoslavia, though? It doesn't seem very attractive to settle in.
Apparently they lived mainly in and around the town of Novi Martinac in Bosnia (Serbian Republic part of Bosnia):

Martinac Novi -

Stowarzyszenie Reemigrantów z Bośni, ich Potomków oraz Przyjaciół w Bolesławcu | reemigranci z Jugosławii, przesiedlenia i migracje ludności Polskiej, Polacy w Bośni, Polacy w Jugosławii, mieszkańcy Bolesławca

After the Austro-Hungarian Empire captured Bosnia from the Ottomans, they organized new settlements there, including Poles from Austrian Galicia.