How many Poles moved into the "Recovered Territories" after the end of World War II?

Apr 2019
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BTW, do you think that more Poles from west of the Curzon Line would have settled in the Recovered Territories in the extremely unlikely event that Stalin, for whatever reason, would have allowed Poland to keep the Kresy after the end of WWII?
Yes it was possible to bring more from west of the Curzon. But even Kresy still had a lot of Poles left. Just look at Soviet 1959 census.

I think the scenario in which Stalin would have allowed Poland to keep all of the Kresy was extremely unlikely.

However, the scenario in which Stalin would have allowed Poland to keep some part of it, was quite probable.

For example, he could have adopted the principle that post-war Poland's area = pre-war Poland's area. In this scenario he would have had to allow Poland to keep ca. 78,000 square kilometers of land east of the Curzon Line. For comparison, adding Lviv alone is just 9,300 km2 extra (area highlighted in the map below covers only ca. 9,300 km2):



If apart from Lviv you add also Grodno, the combined size of these two areas is ca. 10,500 - 11,000 square kilometers.

So even with Lviv and Grodno within Polish borders, post-war Poland would still be much smaller than it was in 1939.

Grodno was awarded a medal for brave defense against the Red Army in 1939, so the loss of it was painful to Poles.

Soviet "Blitzkrieg" against Grodno in 1939:


The panorama of the city:

 
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Futurist

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What were the demographics of Grodno? I'm presuming that, pre-WWII, there were a lot of Jews there who subsequently lost their lives in the Holocaust; however, what was the second-largest ethnic group in Grodno before WWII?
 

Futurist

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May 2014
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As for Soviet Poles, there were a lot of them on the border between Poland, Belarus, and Lithuania--as well as in Vilnius, correct?

I know that Lviv/Lwow only had something like 10% Poles in 1950--with this percentage continuing to sharply fall after that point in time:



I think that the fair solution would have been for Poland to keep all of the Polish-majority areas. Of course, it would have probably been a good thing to do population exchanges afterwards; after all, Ukraine needs all of the pro-Western Ukrainians that it can get! :D
 
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Apr 2019
171
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What were the demographics of Grodno? I'm presuming that, pre-WWII, there were a lot of Jews there who subsequently lost their lives in the Holocaust; however, what was the second-largest ethnic group in Grodno before WWII?
Poles were more numerous than Belarusians in Grodno county and city even according to the Soviet census of 1959 (so already after the deportation of most Poles).

Edit:

Nope, sorry, in 1959 census there were 50,159 Poles (38,1%) and 51,570 Belarusians. The rest Russians and others.
 
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Futurist

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^^^ What is the source of this graph?
It's the demographic data here:

Lviv - Wikipedia

I honestly don't know where they got the 1950 data from, though. It's not sourced like the rest of the data is.

Poles were more numerous than Belarusians in Grodno county and city even according to the Soviet census of 1959 (so already after the deportation of most Poles).

Edit:

Nope, sorry, in 1959 census there were 50,159 Poles (38,1%) and 51,570 Belarusians. The rest Russians and others.
Huh. So, even after the deportations, the Poles were only very slightly outnumbered in Grodno County (this is county-level data, correct?). If so, it really does appear to have been a good move to give Grodno to Poland after WWII. Of course, Stalin could have asked whether Poles in Grodno in 1945 not only outnumber Belarusians, but also outnumber Belarusians plus Ukrainians plus Russians.
 
Apr 2019
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Coming back to this 1950 data by county:

I checked how counties cluster together and about 20 different clusters can be distinguished based on similar population composition:

Font color of county names is based on administrative divisions (not all counties belong to the main cluster of their particular province):



^^^
That clustering was done based on data from the 1950 census about 22 different types of origin according to place of residence in 1939:

Cluster name is listed near each county:



^^^ Here is how the map of clusters looks like, as you can see clusters based on origin of the inhabitants correlate well with geography:



Larger version of the map:

 
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Apr 2019
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Europe
BTW, here is a map showing the distribution of Poles with ancestry from Former Polish Eastern Lands (Kresy) today (2012 survey):

It includes also Poles who have partially ancestry from there - because many people are already mixed among young generations:

 
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Apr 2019
171
Europe
^^^ I wonder if similar data is available for the formerly Non-Czech areas of Sudetenland, which were settled by Czechs and others after WW2.

AFAIK a lot of people in these areas are Volhynian Czechs (= ethnic Czechs from Ukraine), as well as Slovaks, Carpathian Rusyns and Gypsies:

This map shows the distribution of ethnic Czechs in the early 20th century - areas in the north-west of the country had almost no ethnic Czechs:

Köztes-Európa térképtár - text

Köztes-Európa térképtár - map

 
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