How many Slavs (especially Poles) emigrated from territories that became Germanized as a result of the Ostsiedlung?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,877
SoCal
During the Middle Ages, Germans moved eastwards and often settled land that has previously been Slavic (such as Polish land):



This German settlement along with the assimilation of a sizeable number of local Slavs (such as Poles) resulted in a lot of these territories becoming overwhelmingly German by the start of the 20th century (and perhaps much earlier as well):



As you can see on the map above, territories such as Pomerania, Lower Silesia, central East Prussia, and Brandenburg didn't have any sizable minority populations in 1900. In turn, this raises this question:

Did a large number of Slavs (especially Poles) emigrate from these territories once German settlers moved into these territories in the Middle Ages and perhaps beyond that as well? Obviously a lot of Slavs in these territories assimilated and became Germanized, but just how much Slavic emigration from these territories was there? Do we know? Do we at least have any ideas in regards to this?

Any thoughts on this?
 
Apr 2017
1,638
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Why do you think there was? Many of the west Slavic tribes didn't identify as Polish. When the germans conquered the lands of east Germany the Sorbs, Wends and others didn't leave en masse.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,877
SoCal
Why do you think there was? Many of the west Slavic tribes didn't identify as Polish. When the germans conquered the lands of east Germany the Sorbs, Wends and others didn't leave en masse.
The West Slavic tribes didn't always identify as Polish, but a sizable part of Polish territory did in fact become Germanized as a result of the Ostsiedlung. Compare Poland's 1000 borders to Poland's 1569 borders:

 
Apr 2017
1,638
U.S.A.
Did the first three groups not consider themselves to be Poles? I know that Kashubians consider themselves Poles nowadays.
At the time of conquest they did not, overtime the Silesians did. Many modern Kashubians identify as their own ethnicity. The Pomeranians threw off Polish rule several times. Of note is that all these languages are (arguably) distinct west Slavic languages.
 
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