How much dissatisfaction was there with Hitler among top and prominent Nazis in 1943-1945?

MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,219
Kansas
Goering tried to replace Hitler in late April 1945 and was nearly executed for it.

Himmler was trying to conduct secret negotiations with the Allies through the Swedish Red Cross.
And a cute side note to the Swedish Red Cross. All the lead negotiators for the Red Cross, where Jewish.... :)
 
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Jun 2017
2,996
Connecticut
How much dissatisfaction was there with Hitler and especially with Hitler's leadership among top and prominent Nazis in 1943-1945? As in, were there any top and prominent Nazis in 1943-1945 who believed that Hitler was a hindrance to the German war effort and that Germany would be better off under new leadership? If so, who exactly were these Nazis?
Well the July 20th plot was predicated on this. It's also hard to draw the distinction between "Nazis" and Nazis since everyone was technically a Nazi. But the July 20th plot tended to be supported by figures of the German military establishment. But their logic seemed to be based on the allies being willing to negotiate as the possibility of victory completely shut in the months preceding their coup(D-Day, destruction of Army Group centre in the East). I do know that Hitler purged people who had even the feintist ties to the plotters such as Rommel etc and this would have encompassed pretty much all of the leadership who would be even suspected of being in that group.
 

redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,902
Stockport Cheshire UK
Goering tried to replace Hitler in late April 1945 and was nearly executed for it.

Himmler was trying to conduct secret negotiations with the Allies through the Swedish Red Cross.
Both these were in the last days of the war, when it was more a case of everyone save themselves, rather than opposing Hitler.
In Goring's case it wasn't so much a case of opposing Hitler but attempting to assume his role as his replacement a few hours too early.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
Well the July 20th plot was predicated on this. It's also hard to draw the distinction between "Nazis" and Nazis since everyone was technically a Nazi. But the July 20th plot tended to be supported by figures of the German military establishment. But their logic seemed to be based on the allies being willing to negotiate as the possibility of victory completely shut in the months preceding their coup(D-Day, destruction of Army Group centre in the East). I do know that Hitler purged people who had even the feintist ties to the plotters such as Rommel etc and this would have encompassed pretty much all of the leadership who would be even suspected of being in that group.
Did all German military men actually join the Nazi Party?