How much more hostile would Europe be to non-White immigration without the World Wars?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Had one or both of the World Wars not occurred, would Europe (especially Western Europe, given the Eastern Europe is already largely hostile to non-White immigration in real life) be much more hostile to non-White immigration right now?

I know that the World Wars and especially the Second World War significantly weakened support for ideas such as racism and colonialism in the West. As the West became more tolerant, much more non-White people began moving there--to the extent that various Western countries have large and growing non-White populations right now.

Without one or both of the World Wars, how much longer would it have taken for ideas such as racism and colonialism to become passe and out-of-date? Also, would the West have still opened its doors to a lot of non-White immigration in this scenario after racism and colonialism would have lost their popularity in the West?

Any thoughts on all of this?
 
Oct 2018
26
Belgium
Why are you assuming a link between hostility to immigration and skin pigmentation? To use a very current example: a great deal of the resentment in Britain against the EU, which lead to Brexit, is based on hostility to people from other EU countries moving to the UK, whom most of the British consider to be "immigrants" (even most Britons who aren't hostile to them). Skin pigmentation doesn't come into it.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Why are you assuming a link between hostility to immigration and skin pigmentation? To use a very current example: a great deal of the resentment in Britain against the EU, which lead to Brexit, is based on hostility to people from other EU countries moving to the UK, whom most of the British consider to be "immigrants" (even most Britons who aren't hostile to them). Skin pigmentation doesn't come into it.
That's a very good point! That said, though, I was using skin color here because there was probably more racism against non-Whites in the past than there was against Whites. For instance, the U.S. restricted Chinese immigration much earlier than it restricted European immigration, and after the end of World War I, there was a belief that Whites are entitled to national self-determination (unless they belonged to a defeated country) while non-Whites were not.